Sportfishing Season Opens April 1 With New OneDay Licence

first_imgOn April 1 the term “gone fishing” will have more meaning for people with the introduction of a one-day fishing licence. “Through our work, and the support of anglers, we have made several changes to the fishing regulations including a new one-day sportfishing licence which will be available to resident and non-resident anglers,” said Ron Chisholm, Minister of Nova Scotia Fisheries and Aquaculture. Last year more than 100,000 Nova Scotians took to the province’s many rivers and lakes to fish and this season more are expected to take advantage of the new one-day licence. Changes in regulations in the various recreation management areas have been developed through the six Recreational Fisheries Advisory Councils, in co-operation with Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources. The one-day licence, which will cost $11.88, will allow anglers to experience sportfishing in Nova Scotia without purchasing a more expensive seasonal licence. The Nova Scotia Sportfish Fund, a portion of most fishing licence fees, provides funding for restoration and protection of fish habitat helping to sustain a healthy sportfishery. Last year anglers contributed $213,500 to the fund which, in turn, enabled 19 community groups to work on 33 watercourses in 19 watershed areas. “Community groups and volunteers contribute valuable service to our recreational fisheries and this fund provides them with resources they need to continue their excellent work,” said Mr. Chisholm. The new regulations and changes to existing regulations are included in the 2006 Angler’s Handbook and Summary of Regulations, which accompanies each fishing licence. There is no increase in any licence fees this season with seniors’ fishing licences still available at $5.75 (tax included), a general licence for the season costs $24.13 (tax included) for residents of Nova Scotia and $54.74 for non-residents. Non-residents also have the option to purchase a seven-day which costs $30.25. All anglers 16 years of age and older must purchase a general fishing licence. Licences are valid from the date of issue until March 31, 2007. Anglers who plan to fish during the winter portion of the angling season should keep their licence and return their stub at the end of the season. It is mandatory to return the licence stubs after the last fishing trip of the season. Anglers will once again have the opportunity to register larger catches in the Nova Scotia Fish Registry. This database of large and record-sized fish caught in the province is an exciting way to generate interest in sportfishing. Anglers are invited to submit fish in the catch and release, catch and keep, and youth categories. Nova Scotians are also encouraged to participate in the eleventh annual Nova Scotia Sportfishing Weekend to be held June 3 and 4. “During this special weekend Nova Scotia residents can fish without a general fishing licence. It is a great opportunity to get outside and enjoy recreational fishing in Nova Scotia,” said Mr. Chisholm. Information on angling and a list of special regulations by recreational fishing area can be found on the Fisheries and Aquaculture website at www.gov.ns.ca/nsaf/sportfishing .last_img read more

Television Series Based on Stephen King Novel Films in Province

first_imgNova Scotia’s economy continues to benefit from the film industry thanks to skilled crews, talented actors, unique locations, infrastructure, and one of the most competitive tax credits in the industry. The province recently landed the production of a $23-million television series, Haven, for the American Syfy Channel and Showcase Television in Canada. The supernatural series is based on the novel The Colorado Kid by Stephen King and is being shot in Lunenburg. “This is the first American dramatic television series to be filmed in Nova Scotia,” said Ann MacKenzie, president and CEO of Film Nova Scotia. “The Haven team chose the province because they saw we had the complete package, including a strong film tax credit incentive. We hope their decision to film here will open the door for future U.S.-based television series.” The tax credit is one of the highest in the country and offers a strong incentive to film in rural Nova Scotia. Production companies can receive a credit of up to 65 per cent on labour or 35 per cent of total production costs. E1 Entertainment, which is producing the series, determined that Nova Scotia provided the best overall production value. Attracting these kinds of investments to the province, especially to rural areas, creates good jobs and grows the economy. This helps to strengthen our communities and makes life better for families in every region. Not only is the series being shot in Lunenburg, E1 is partnering with Big Motion Pictures of Chester to produce the series. This is the second partnership for the two companies over the past 12 months. Call Me Fitz was filmed in New Minas in the fall of 2009. “Big Motion Pictures is very pleased to be co-producing another television series with E1,” said executive producer David MacLeod. “The financial and logistical support provided by Film Nova Scotia plays a crucial role in making these inter-provincial co-productions work.” Thirteen one-hour episodes of Haven have been ordered. The series features actors Emily Rose (Jericho), Lucas Bryant (Queer as Folk, Dollhouse), Eric Balfour (24, Six Feet Under) and local actor John Dunsworth (Trailer Park Boys). The executive producers are Shawn Piller, Lloyd Segan and Scott Shepherd (The Dead Zone). Film Nova Scotia is a provincial Crown agency reporting to the minister of Economic and Rural Development. The corporation provides a wide range of programs and services to build the capacity and competitiveness of the province’s film, television and new media industry. The provincial film industry is the fourth largest in Canada, regularly employing 3,000 people and exceeding $100 million in economic activity annually.last_img read more

Brain-dead donor saves the lives of two patients in Fez and…

Rabat – A medical team from the Hassan II University Hospital in the city of Fez has successfully performed a kidney transplant from a brain-dead donor in order to save the lives of two patients located in the cities of Fez and Casablanca, MAP reports. The transplant, the first of its kind to be performed on a brain-dead donor in the Hassan II hospital in Fez, was to help a woman from the city of Fez who was suffering from a chronic renal failure in its final stages.According to a statement from the University hospital, the surgical procedure also saved the life of a Casablanca patient who benefited from the second kidney which was taken from the same donor. The hospital hailed the “courageous decision of the family of the deceased to donate his both kidneys and the competence and experience of the medical, surgical and nursing staff at the Hassan II university hospital.“This surgical intervention is part of the efforts made by the Ministry of Health and the University Hospital Hassan II in Fez, which aim to encourage the donation of organs and tissues,” read the statement.© Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributed read more

Bangladesh Seeks Investment From Morocco

Rabat – Bangladesh’s Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina met the newly-appointed Moroccan ambassador to Bangladesh, Majid Halim, in the Bangladesh capital of Dhaka on Monday, June 19 to discuss potential investments for “mutual benefits of both countries.”Halim explained that since the two countries were “brotherly,” enhancing their cooperation would be a main goal.Financial Express Dhaka reported that the ambassador was also eager to enhance economic and trade relations between the countries, saying “the areas of cooperation can be explored further.” He also offered support in tourism, power and renewable energy sectors. Press Secretary Ihsanul Karim spoke to journalists after the pair’s meeting and suggested that Bangladesh and Morocco have much in common since their both of their economies are agrarian.Hasina offered to share Bangladesh’s experiences with the Kingdom and asserted that she wanted “to develop the country [Bangladesh] in line with the dream of Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman.”Formerly the Moroccan ambassador to Guinea, Majid Halim became the Moroccan ambassador to Bangladesh at the end of 2016. read more

World needs to do more to help people of Southern Sudan UN

23 March 2007The international community must do more to help the people of Southern Sudan, especially the hundreds of thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) now returning to their homes following the end of the civil war two years ago, the United Nations humanitarian chief said today in the southern city of Juba, while also highlighting the urgent need for peace in the strife-torn Darfur region. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator John Holmes made his remarks on the second day of his two-week, three-country mission to Africa. While in Juba, he met with First Vice President of Sudan and President of the Government of Southern Sudan, Salva Kiir, Vice President of the Government of Southern Sudan, Riek Machar, along with UN and other officials.“I am very encouraged by what is happening here, but the needs are tremendous. We all – UN, donors and NGOs (non governmental organizations) – need to do much more to support the Government and people in Southern Sudan. Recovery and development activities need to be accelerated, and the benefits of peace to become more apparent,” he said.While what is largely viewed as the world’s largest humanitarian crisis unfolds in Darfur, securing funding for Southern Sudan remains a significant challenge, noted the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). In his meetings with the President and Vice President Mr. Holmes stressed the importance of reaching a political solution in that region as being important for the whole of the country.“If there isn’t a peaceful resolution in Darfur, it is much harder to maintain peace in the rest of Sudan, including in the South. The President of the Government of Southern Sudan seems very willing to engage on this issue, and to bring his considerable experience to the table.”Mr. Holmes will now travel on to Darfur and visit field locations this Saturday and Sunday in the region, where at least 200,000 people have been killed and more than 2 million forced to flee their homes over the past four years because of fighting between Government forces and allied Janjaweed militias against rebel groups battling for more autonomy.In a related development, as part of UN efforts to try and re-energize the stalled peace process in Darfur, the Secretary-General’s Special Envoy Jan Eliasson has arrived in Khartoum from Eritrea, where he was scheduled to meet with African Union (AU) Special Envoy Salim Ahmed Salim on a five-day mission to the country. read more

Brock hosts binational conference

From left: Carol Merriam, Associate Dean of Humanities; Brigadier-General Gerry Champagne; Lieutenant-General J. M. Duval; David Petis, Vice-President University Advancement; Marta Moszczenska, Consulate General of Canada in Buffalo; Douglas Kneale, Dean of Humanities.Top military and foreign officials visited Brock last week as part of a five-day Binational Executive Seminar on Canada-U.S. Relations.The seminar was held in partnership with the University at Buffalo. It hosted legislative and political staff members from federal and state/provincial governments in Canada and the U.S. and aimed to increase understanding of their counterparts across the border.Attendees included Lieutenant-General J. M. Duval, deputy commander of NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command), and Brigadier-General Gerry Champagne, deputy commander of Canada Command. read more

Corruption is major obstacle to achieving Agenda 2030 Nigerian leader tells UN

Warning that corruption undermines achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari took the podium of the United Nations General Assembly today to call on all countries to sign up to the UN Convention against Corruption (UNCAC).“The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) underscore the imperative for our collective will towards finding enduring and sustainable solutions to addressing global disparities,” he told the Assembly’s annual General Debate on its opening day, referring to the 2030 Agenda that seeks to eliminate poverty, hunger and a host of social ills within the next 14 years.“Corruption freezes development, thereby undermining the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals,” he said, citing his own Government’s efforts to combat the scourge, including the significant recovery of stolen assets which are then channelled towards the development of critical infrastructure and the implementation of social inclusion programmes. Asset restitution is a major plank in the UNCAC, adopted 13 years ago and the only legally binding universal anti-corruption instrument. It now has 179 States Parties out of a UN membership of 193 countries. “Nigeria will continue to advocate for the facilitation of the recovery of illicit financial assets,” Mr. Buhari said, calling on those States that have yet to sign up to UNCAC to do so.He also noted the “giant step” towards addressing climate change taken in the Paris accord last December, noting the adverse effects that climate change has already manifested in the drying up of Lake Chad, threatening the livelihood of some 30 million inhabitants of the Lake Chad Basin, spread across Cameroun, Chad, Niger and Nigeria.“The cost of replenishing the lake has been put at $14 billion under a five year plan which should be accorded global attention,” he said. “Nigeria also supports the African Union initiative on the Great Green Wall to halt desertification.”Turning to security, Mr. Buhari cited the “remarkable progress” Nigeria has made in its resolve to defeat the Boko Haram terrorist group, whose “capacity to launch orchestrated attacks as a formed group has been severely degraded.”He called on those nations that have not yet done so to sign and ratify the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) which seeks to stop the proliferation of small arms and light weapons that nurture the spread of terrorism. read more

NZ lecturer comes up with new theory re Alexander the Greats death

first_imgThe world might need to revisit one of the greatest debates of antiquity and rewrite history, as what killed Alexander the Great could well be Guillain-Barre syndrome.Dr Katherine Hall, a senior lecturer of the Dunedin School of Medicine in New Zealand believes that the legendary Macedonian king was not dead but paralysed when he was buried.To this day, the most prominent theory regarding the 32-year-old Greek militant’s death has been poisoning resulting in high fever followed by infection and symptoms of alcoholism.Dr Hall, also a practicing clinician, argues that his state, when presumed dead could have a neurological disorder causing paralysis to the body.“So Alexander could very well have been lying there, unable to move a muscle, and actually still alive because they didn’t actually take pulses at that time to determine whether people were dead,” she said suggesting the condition could have affected his motor nerves.“My theory actually provides a rationale for why he did not decompose. And that being, that he wasn’t actually dead yet,” Ms Hall said.The researcher and her colleagues from Otago University began studying the case during a BBC documentary which supported the theory that the great king was poisoned using a white hellebore plant.What has always contemplated historians and archaeologists is the reason his corpse reportedly started showing signs of decomposing six days after recorded date of death 10 June, 323 B.C.; a fact that puzzled physicians in Babylon at the time and reinforced the belief that Alexander the Great was a god or demigod.“For one thing, if my theory is correct, the history books should be rewritten actually. Because his date of death should actually be six days later than what is recorded,” she continued.In her article published in The Ancient History Bulletin, she insisted previous theories around his death in 323BC have not been satisfactory as they have not explained the entire event.“In particular, none have provided an all-encompassing answer which gives a plausible and feasible explanation for a fact recorded by one source—Alexander’s body failed to show any signs of decomposition for six days after his death.“The Ancient Greeks thought that this proved that Alexander was a god; this article is the first to provide a real-world answer,” she said.“I wanted to stimulate new debate and discussion and possibly rewrite the history books by arguing Alexander’s real death was six days later than previously accepted. His death may be the most famous case of pseudothanatos, or false diagnosis of death, ever recorded. While more modern analyses have attempted to be broader and more nuanced, whatever way people want to conceive of Alexander there is a desire to try and understand his life as fulsomely as possible. The enduring mystery of his cause of death continues to attract both public and scholastic interest.“The elegance of the GBS diagnosis for the cause of his death is that it explains so many, otherwise diverse, elements, and renders them into a coherent whole.” Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

WWE draws sellout crowd for Extreme Rules in Chicago

first_img Twitter Kurt Angle Now Playing Up Next Seth Rollins Ronda Rousey On WWE: I Love This Job, But I Dont Need It Seth Rollins Defends WWE On Two Separate Occasions Ronda Rousey Highlighting WWEs Problems Joan Jett Set To Perform Ronda Rouseys Entrance At WrestleMania 35 Facebook WhatsApp Now Playing Up Next Tony Khan talks to the media after All Out, addresses Jon Moxley, Chris Jericho and more Videos Articles Now Playing Up Nextcenter_img AEW on TNT returning to Sears Centre Arena in Chicago on Thanksgiving Eve Now Playing Up Next Now Playing Up Next Pinterest Cesaro Roman Reigns is in Remission Last week’s WWE Extreme Rules PPV live from Chicago on 4/26 drew a sellout crowd of 11,000 paid fans at the Allstate Arena.Source: The Wrestling Observer NewsletterRecommended videosPowered by AnyClipSeth Rollins Defends WWE On Two Separate OccasionsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseUnmuteDuration 0:30/Current Time 0:03Loaded: 100.00%0:03Remaining Time -0:27 FullscreenUp NextThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Replay the list Videos Articles Adam Martin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Videos Articles AEW announces limited tickets are available for tonight’s All Out Pay-Per View last_img read more

Indoor Public Smoking Banned In Alaska Starting Today

first_imgThose who step outside to smoke must been at least 10 feet away from an entrance to a bar or restaurant; and 20 feet of an entrance, open window or heating or ventilation system intake. Smoking in pretty much any workplace whether it’s a public-facing business like restaurants, bars and music venues or more closed to the public like an office or hotel room is also banned. Sen. Micciche: “Senate Bill 63 does not prohibit outdoor smoking except near where it affects others.The bill does not legislate the employment of smokers or non smokers, and local government will retain their ability for more restrictive local provisions.”  Senate Bill 63, commonly called the “Take it Outside Act,” was sponsored by Senator Peter Micciche (R-K-Pen), to protect Alaskans working indoors from secondhand smoke. The ban refers to tobacco, marijuana and e-cigarettes in public places, including bars and restaurants. The new law also bans smoking outdoors at open-air venues like the seating area of outdoor concerts and sporting events, as well as near entrances to buildings affected by the ban and near playgrounds when children are present. Smoking on public transportation or in shared work vehicles is also banned. Governor Bill Walker signed the statewide smoke-free workplace bill into law in July at the Lucky Wishbone, reportedly the first restaurant in Alaska to go completely smoke-free. If a community decides it wants to allow smoking in those environments, they can choose to “opt out” by putting the question on the ballot for the residents of the area to vote on. Businesses affected by the ban are required to put up signs that reads “Smoking Prohibited by Law–Fine $50.” Businesses that fail to post these signs will be liable for a fine between $50 and $300. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Workers and customers of Alaska businesses who smoke will now need to ‘take it outside’ starting today, October 1.last_img read more

Job Cuts Coming at Reed Elsevier

first_imgA quick e-mail exchange I had today with Reed Business Information’s vice president of corporate communications regarding a report in the England’s Telegraph newspaper on 1,000 impending job cuts at the parent company:From: Jason Fell [mailto:jfell@red7media.com] Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2008 9:58 AMTo: [REDACTED]Subject: FOLIO: StoryImportance: HighGood morning Salina. I hope you had a nice weekend.I read this story this morning about Reed Elsevier planning to cut 1,000 jobs. (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.jhtml?xml=/money/2008/02/17/cnreed117.xml)I’m curious: How will this impact Reed’s North American magazine business? Please get back to me at your earliest convenience as I am working on a strict deadline.Thanks!From: [REDACTED] Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2008 10:18 AMTo: Jason FellSubject: RE: FOLIO: StoryHi Jason,We can offer no further comments until Reed Elsevier’s annual results are announced on Thursday (February 21).~Salinalast_img read more

Olivia NewtonJohn Launches Campaign For Cancer Research

first_imgNews Email Olivia Newton-John Launches Campaign For Cancer Research The We Go Together campaign aims to raise $1 million for critical cancer research and trials, and to deliver holistic care to cancer patients in need. Supporters are encouraged to donate money and upload video messages of strength and courage on social media using the hashtag #WeGoTogether to inspire or support someone battling cancer or coping with the loss of a loved one.This update comes just months after the tragic news of the return of Newton-John’s breast cancer, causing her to postpone her tour back in May. The Grease singer/actress was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 1992.”I’d like to express my gratitude to all of you who sent such kind and loving messages of support over the past few months,” she said. “Your prayers and well wishes have truly helped me, and continued to lift my spirits. I’m feeling great, and so look forward to seeing you soon.”Learn How MusiCares Supports Music Professionals With Health And Human Services Twitter Facebook Olivia Newton-John’s Cancer Research Campaign olivia-newton-john-launches-campaign-cancer-research ‘Grease’ star’s new fundraising campaign aims to raise $1 million by encouraging donors to share words of inspirationNate HertweckGRAMMYs Aug 21, 2017 – 2:48 pm Olivia Newton-John shared a special message with her fans via her Facebook page today. The GRAMMY winner announced a new fundraising campaign titled We Go Together launched by her Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness and Research Centre. Read morelast_img read more

Google Yahoo Prefer Asians as Programmers Not Senior Executives

first_imgTechnology giants such as Google, Yahoo, Intel, and others prefer to see Asians as programmers, not as senior executives, according to a study.A study by Ascend revealed the imbalance between the number of Asians in non-management jobs and leadership positions in Silicon Valley.”If you step in the cafeteria of any of these five companies, you will see plenty of Asian talent around,” said Denise Peck, co-author of the study and former vice-president of Cisco Systems, according to The Economic Times.”It’s only when you walk into the executive suites at these companies that you might see a problem,” Peck said.The findings of the study are based on 2013 data filed with the US employment regulators by Google Inc., Yahoo Inc., Intel Corp., Hewlett-Packard Co., and LinkedIn Corp.Ascend’s report coincides with growing criticism on hiring practices by the technology companies and the findings may bring to the fore new issues concerning ethnic and gender biases in Silicon Valley.Asians accounted for 27 percent of professional jobs at the five Silicon Valley companies, while occupying just 14 percent of executive cadre, the report said.In contrast, whites held 62 percent of the professional jobs and 80 percent of executive positions.The report found Asian women confronting a “double whammy” of racial and sexual discrimination, with just one Asian female executive for every 287 Asian women professionals at the five studied companies.On the other hand, there is one white female executive for every 123 white women in professional jobs.However, the report attributes cultural disparity as one of the reasons for lesser number of Asian executives in the technology industry.”There are cultural norms and attitudes that help get Asians to a certain level of success, but then work against them and hold them back from reaching a higher rank,” said Peck, a Chinese-American.Finally, the report says companies can overcome the challenges; for instance, Indian-origin Satya Nadella, who heads Microsoft Corporation, has scored well since he took charge in February 2014.last_img read more

Sneak Preview Beatles Abbey Road 50th Anniversary Edition Features Dazzling Sound Unreleased

first_imgThe Beatles’ body of work has been so worshipped, scrutinized and dissected that 50 years later, one could wonder what’s left to discover. After all, how much more can one say about “Abbey Road”? It’s arguably the greatest album by the greatest group of all time, and is one of the premiere artistic statements of its era. And as the final album the Beatles made together — it was recorded after “Let It Be” but released before  — it was created in a spirit of pre-breakup détente: The Beatles knew they were splitting up, so they made one last big effort for the team, and consequently, “Abbey Road” has none of the tension and contentiousness of “The White Album” and “Let It Be.” It’s all harmony, in every sense of the word.Although the Beatles’ catalog has already been revisited several times — first on CD in the ‘80s, then the “Anthology” rarities series in the ‘90s, then in meticulously remastered stereo editions in the ‘00s, then in mono, and now in 50th anniversary editions — each one has revealed tantalizing surprises for longtime fans. Beatles’ ‘Abbey Road’ to Get Deluxe 50-Year Treatment in September Related Hundreds Gather at Abbey Road to Celebrate 50th Anniversary of Beatles’ Album Cover Something (Take 39 – Instrumental – Strings Only)Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Take 17 – Instrumental – Strings & Brass Only)BLU-RAY: Abbey Road Audio Features:– Dolby Atmos– 96kHz/24 bit DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1– 96kHz/24 bit High Res Stereo (2019 Stereo Mix)DELUXE 3LP VINYL BOX SET (limited edition)LP ONE: Side 1 (2019 Stereo Mix)Come TogetherSomethingMaxwell’s Silver HammerOh! DarlingOctopus’s GardenI Want You (She’s So Heavy)LP ONE: Side 2 (2019 Stereo Mix)Here Comes The SunBecauseYou Never Give Me Your MoneySun KingMean Mr MustardPolythene PamShe Came In Through The Bathroom WindowGolden SlumbersCarry That WeightThe EndHer MajestyLP TWO: Side 1 (Sessions)I Want You (She’s So Heavy) (Trident Recording Session and Reduction Mix)Goodbye (Home Demo)Something (Studio Demo)The Ballad Of John And Yoko (Take 7)Old Brown Shoe (Take 2)LP TWO: Side 2 (Sessions)Oh! Darling (Take 4)Octopus’s Garden (Take 9)You Never Give Me Your Money (Take 36)Her Majesty (Takes 1–3)Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Takes 1–3) / Medley)Here Comes The Sun (Take 9)Maxwell’s Silver Hammer (Take 12)LP THREE: Side 1 (Sessions)Come Together (Take 5)The End (Take 3)Come and Get It (Studio Demo)Sun King (Take 20)Mean Mr Mustard (Take 20)Polythene Pam (Take 27)She Came In Through The Bathroom Window (Take 27)Because (Take 1 Instrumental)LP THREE: Side 2 (Sessions)The Long One (Trial Edit & Mix – 30 July 1969)Something (Take 39 – Instrumental – Strings Only)Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Take 17 – Instrumental – Strings & Brass Only)DELUXE 2CDCD ONE: 2019 Stereo MixCD TWO: Sessions Come Together (Take 5)Something (Studio Demo)Maxwell’s Silver Hammer (Take 12)Oh! Darling (Take 4)Octopus’s Garden (Take 9)I Want You (She’s So Heavy) (Trident Recording Session & Reduction Mix)Here Comes The Sun (Take 9)Because (Take 1 Instrumental)You Never Give Me Your Money (Take 36)Sun King (Take 20)Mean Mr Mustard (Take 20)Polythene Pam (Take 27)She Came In Through The Bathroom Window (Take 27)Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Takes 1–3 / Medley)The End (Take 3)Her Majesty (Takes 1–3)STANDARD [1CD; digital; 1LP vinyl; limited edition 1LP picture disc vinyl] The set focuses not just on the album but also on the singles recorded during its sessions, and early versions of “The Ballad of John and Yoko” and “Old Brown Shoe” are included in the set, as are Paul McCartney’s demos of “Goodbye” (recorded at home on acoustic guitar) and “Come and Get It” (given to Apple recording artists Mary Hopkin and Badfinger, respectively). Since the “Abbey Road” sessions overlapped with those of “Let It Be” — which was recorded before, but released after, “Abbey Road” — some other contemporaneous recordings will be included in that anniversary reissue, which has not been officially announced, but everyone knows is getting the 50th anniversary treatment next year.But in the meantime, the “Abbey Road” anniversary edition provides some wonderful surprises, even for those who have heard the album hundreds of times.Abbey Road Anniversary EditionTracklistsSUPER DELUXE [3CD+1Blu-ray set; digital audio collection]CD ONE: 2019 Stereo MixCome TogetherSomethingMaxwell’s Silver HammerOh! DarlingOctopus’s GardenI Want You (She’s So Heavy)Here Comes The SunBecauseYou Never Give Me Your MoneySun KingMean Mr MustardPolythene PamShe Came In Through The Bathroom WindowGolden SlumbersCarry That WeightThe EndHer MajestyCD TWO: Sessions I Want You (She’s So Heavy) (Trident Recording Session & Reduction Mix)Goodbye (Home Demo)Something (Studio Demo)The Ballad Of John And Yoko (Take 7)Old Brown Shoe (Take 2)Oh! Darling (Take 4)Octopus’s Garden (Take 9)You Never Give Me Your Money (Take 36)Her Majesty (Takes 1–3)Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Takes 1–3 / Medley)Here Comes The Sun (Take 9)Maxwell’s Silver Hammer (Take 12) CD THREE: Sessions Come Together (Take 5)The End (Take 3)Come And Get It (Studio Demo)Sun King (Take 20)Mean Mr Mustard (Take 20)Polythene Pam (Take 27)She Came In Through  The Bathroom Window (Take 27)Because (Take 1 – Instrumental)The Long One (Trial Edit & Mix – 30 July 1969)(Medley: You Never Give Me Your Money, Sun King, Mean Mr Mustard, Her Majesty, Polythene Pam, She Came In Through The Bathroom Window, Golden Slumbers, Carry That Weight, The End) And as evidenced by a Monday sneak preview of the “Abbey Road” anniversary edition — which has been remixed by longtime Beatles producer George Martin’s son Giles in stereo, high res stereo, 5.1 surround, and Dolby Atmos, and comes out on Sept. 27 — there were plenty of delightful surprises lurking in the previous mixes, and lots of outtakes that haven’t made the rounds. The remixes unveil many previously hidden elements in the songs — mostly subtle ones, but exciting to fans all the same — and just two of the outtakes were previously released, and in slightly different versions.The full tracklist appears below and granular details of the set can be found here, but all anyone who’s read this far will care about is what it sounds like — and, speaking as someone who has heard every second of this album hundreds of times since the age of 6, it sounds amazing.Most of the new remix of the album was played, along with parts of the special “Atmos” mix — and hearing it over the mind-blowing sound system at the Dolby 24 Screening Room in New York is a privileged setting that won’t be recreated in most mortals’ homes. With that caveat, it sounds stunning: The remix places the listener in the center of the music, with the so-familiar elements of the Beatles’ sound — the breathtaking vocal harmonies, the snarling electric guitars, Ringo’s cascading drum rolls and Paul McCartney’s astonishing bass playing — moving from one speaker to the next fluidly.“Abbey Road” is arguably the most cleanly produced and arranged Beatles album, and the new remix places it in dramatic relief: The vocals on “Because” and the sweeping strings on “Something” (the latter of which were played in isolation during this session) have never sounded so full and pristine.The unreleased material is equally fascinating. Aired during this session was a stunning, extended early version of John Lennon’s “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” that finds the group edging into noise-rock, as guest keyboardist Billy Preston wails away on the organ. Also played was an earlier take of “Octopus’ Garden,” close to the final but featuring some priceless studio banter between the soon-to-be-former bandmates. When the take breaks down, Lennon jokes to Ringo, “I thought you were about to sing ‘In an octopus’ garden with John,” to laughter. The segment ends with Ringo joking about the reason the take broke down: “Maybe I came in too early … or maybe you did!” 2019 Stereo Mix Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Researchers find nematode incites defense response in plants that benefits itself

first_imgAn infective Heterodera schachtii worm enters a wildtype Arabidopsis root. The brown DAB stain indicates accumulation of hydrogen peroxide that is produced due to the activity of NADPH oxidases. Credit: Siddique et al., 2014 © 2014 Phys.org Journal information: Science Signaling Explore further Citation: Researchers find nematode incites defense response in plants that benefits itself (2014, April 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-nematode-incites-defense-response-benefits.html Banana plant fights off crop’s invisible nemesis: Roundworms (Phys.org) —A team of researchers at the University of Bonn has discovered that a certain species of nematode actually does better when exposed to defensive chemicals made by plants. In their paper published in the journal Science Signaling, the team describes how they found that disabling the production of a defensive chemical in a flowering plant caused nematodes that invade it to fare less well. Baomin Feng and Libo Shan offer a Perspective Piece on the work done by the team in the same issue.center_img More information: “Parasitic Worms Stimulate Host NADPH Oxidases to Produce Reactive Oxygen Species that Limit Plant Cell Death and Promote Infection,” by S. Siddique et al. Science Signaling, 2014. The research suggests that it might be possible to reduce nematode infestations in vegetable crops by modifying them to produce less ROS, though that would likely mean having to add more antibacterial agents at the same time. A Heterodera schachtii infective worm enters a mutant Arabidopsis. At the site of nurse cell induction, it releases effectors in the selected cell. Due to the lack of RbohD activity to produce ROS, cells that had been affected earlier produce large amounts of callose depositions and undergo cell death. Credit: Siddique et al., 2014 Prior research has shown that plants produce chemicals known as reactive oxygen species (ROS) to ward off fungal and bacterial infections. But now it appears that the same defensive mechanism in some plants allows a certain type of nematode to thrive.H.schachtii, a type of nematode invades many types of plants—its larvae burrow into roots and take up residence near the cylinder that transports nutrients to the rest of the plant. The worm chews on cells causing them to combine, then eats the result while growing into an adult. The worms don’t kill the plant, they simply use it as a place to live and eat. To better understand how it is that the worms withstand the release of ROS when they enter a root, the researchers genetically modified an Arabidopsis plant so that it would not produce ROS when attacked. To their surprise they found that when they introduced the nematode to the root, the worm actually did worse in the absence of the defensive chemicals.Normally ROS does its job by killing plant cells in the vicinity of an attack—without live cells to attack, bacteria die as well. But with the nematode, the researchers found, ROS cell killing is controlled, or managed by the parasite, which allows the worm to fuse the cells it’s after and grow large and healthy. Without the ROS, they found it more difficult to get to the root cylinder, created a smaller fuse cell and as a result didn’t grow as large or as healthy as they did in non-modified plants. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

An AntiAging Pundit Solves a DecadesOld Math Problem

first_imgDe Grey’s 1,581-vertex graph. (Click here for a high-resolution version.)Olena Shmahalo/Quanta Magazine; Source: Aubrey de GreyThe discovery of any graph that requires five colors was a major accomplishment, but mathematicians wanted to see if they could find a smaller graph that would do the same. Perhaps finding a smaller five-color graph — or the smallest possible five-color graph — would give researchers further insight into the Hadwiger-Nelson problem, allowing them to prove that exactly five shades (or six, or seven) are enough to color a graph made from all the points of the plane. In 1950 Edward Nelson, then a student at the University of Chicago, asked the kind of deceptively simple question that can give mathematicians fits for decades. Imagine, he said, a graph—a collection of points connected by lines. Ensure that all of the lines are exactly the same length, and that everything lies on the plane. Now color all the points, ensuring that no two connected points have the same color. Nelson asked: What is the smallest number of colors that you’d need to color any such graph, even one formed by linking an infinite number of vertices?The problem, now known as the Hadwiger-Nelson problem or the problem of finding the chromatic number of the plane, has piqued the interest of many mathematicians, including the famously prolific Paul Erdős. Researchers quickly narrowed the possibilities down, finding that the infinite graph can be colored by no fewer than four and no more than seven colors. Other researchers went on to prove a few partial results in the decades that followed, but no one was able to change these bounds.Then last week, Aubrey de Grey, a biologist known for his claims that people alive today will live to the age of 1,000, posted a paper to the scientific preprint site arxiv.org with the title “The Chromatic Number of the Plane Is at Least 5.” In it, he describes the construction of a unit-distance graph that can’t be colored with only four colors. The finding represents the first major advance in solving the problem since shortly after it was introduced. “I got extraordinarily lucky,” de Grey said. “It’s not every day that somebody comes up with the solution to a 60-year-old problem.”De Grey appears to be an unlikely mathematical trailblazer. He is the co-founder and chief science officer of an organization that aims to develop technologies for “reversing the negative effects of aging.” He found his way to the chromatic number of the plane problem through a board game. Decades ago, de Grey was a competitive Othello player, and he fell in with some mathematicians who were also enthusiasts of the game. They introduced him to graph theory, and he comes back to it now and then. “Occasionally, when I need a rest from my real job, I’ll think about math,” he said. Over Christmas last year, he had a chance to do that.It is unusual, but not unheard of, for an amateur mathematician to make significant progress on a long-standing open problem. In the 1970s, Marjorie Rice, a homemaker with no mathematical background, ran across a Scientific American column about pentagons that tile the plane. She eventually added four new pentagons to the list. Gil Kalai, a mathematician at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said it is gratifying to see a nonprofessional mathematician make a major breakthrough. “It really adds to the many facets of the mathematical experience,” he said.Perhaps the most famous graph coloring question is the four-color theorem. It states that, assuming every country is one continuous lump, any map can be colored using only four colors so that no two adjacent countries have the same color. The exact sizes and shapes of the countries don’t matter, so mathematicians can translate the problem into the world of graph theory by representing every country as a vertex and connecting two vertices with an edge if the corresponding countries share a border.Lucy Reading-Ikkanda/Quanta MagazineThe Hadwiger-Nelson problem is a bit different. Instead of considering a finite number of vertices, as there would be on a map, it considers infinitely many vertices, one for each point in the plane. Two points are connected by an edge if they are exactly one unit apart. To find a lower bound for the chromatic number, it suffices to create a graph with a finite number of vertices that requires a particular number of colors. That’s what de Grey did.De Grey based his graph on a gadget called the Moser spindle, named after mathematical brothers Leo and William Moser. It is a configuration of just seven points and 11 edges that has a chromatic number of four. Through a delicate process, and with minimal computer assistance, de Grey fused copies of the Moser spindle and another small assembly of points into a 20,425-vertex monstrosity that could not be colored using four colors. He was later able to shrink the graph to 1,581 vertices and do a computer check to verify that it was not four-colorable. De Grey pitched the problem of finding the minimal five-color graph to Terence Tao, a mathematician at the University of California, Los Angeles, as a potential Polymath problem. Polymath began about 10 years ago when Timothy Gowers, a mathematician at the University of Cambridge, wanted to find a way to facilitate massive online collaborations in mathematics. Work on Polymath problems is done publicly, and anyone can contribute. Recently, de Grey was involved with a Polymath collaboration that led to significant progress on the twin prime problem.Tao says not every math problem is a good fit for Polymath, but de Grey’s has a few things going for it. The problem is easy to understand and start working on, and there is a clear measure of success: lowering the number of vertices in a non-four-colorable graph. Soon enough, Dustin Mixon, a mathematician at Ohio State University, and his collaborator Boris Alexeev found a graph with 1,577 vertices. On Saturday, Marijn Heule, a computer scientist at the University of Texas, Austin, found one with just 874 vertices. Yesterday he lowered this number to 826 vertices.Such work has sparked hope that the six-decade-old Hadwiger-Nelson problem is worth another look. “For a problem like this, the final solution might be some incredibly deep mathematics,” said Gordon Royle, a mathematician at the University of Western Australia. “Or it could just be somebody’s ingenuity finding a graph that requires many colors.”Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciences.last_img read more

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first_img Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items Videos | March 22, 2011 Invivo – DynaTrim MRI Prostate Biopsy Device Increases Patient Comfort DynaCAD for prostate and DynaTRIM, both part of Invivoâ??s Prostate Clinical Solution, give physicians the tools to perform real-time analysis of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and the support for an MRI-guided prostate biopsy. The device was showcased at RSNA 2010.DynaTRIM is a fully MR-compatible interventional device for transrectal interventional MR biopsy of the prostate gland. It is a removable device that is designed to affix to an imaging table to an open design that allows for flexibility in coil choice and a cleanable foam pad for extra patient comfort. The DynaTRIM needle guide is smaller than the endorectal probe used for traditional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, so it usually is better tolerated by patients.Invivo also has recently made an agreement with CorTechs Labs to be the key distributor for the NeuroQuant product in the U.S. marketplace. NeuroQuant will augment Invivoâ??s DynaSuite Neuro Solution by providing enhanced diagnostic capabilities to healthcare practitioners that may help in the assessment of patients with Alzheimerâ??s, epilepsy and other neurological disorders. DynaSuite Neuro is an MR neuro solution designed for optimal workflow and repeatable analysis for pediatrics and adults. The data is automatically processed and displayed in predefined layouts, which are customizable for the physicianâ??s preference. The simplified user interface provides the neuroradiologist with the tools to analyze perfusion (PWI), diffusion (DWI) and functional MRI (fMRI) quickly and easily.DynaSuite Neuro is compatible with all major MRI systems. Data sets from the MR system are automatically sent to DynaSuite Neuro, processed in the background and registered to a high resolution 3-D T1. In each review screen, images are synchronized for easy viewing and correlation.DynaSuite Neuro is designed to streamline workflow through automated processes. Registration, vessel, skull stripping, diffusion and fMRI QC applications facilitate a visual inspection of results and making adjustments to positioning or thresholds. DynaSuite Neuro also has the ability to create a â??results image seriesâ? and a final report. The results images as well as the report can be sent to a PACS system and automatically combined with the original study data. The report is converted to a DICOM file and can be viewed with the images. The results images can also be exported to a surgical planning system. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享center_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatmentslast_img read more

TravelManagers amazing race around Waikiki

first_imgTravelManagers’ amazing race around WaikikiTravelManagers’ amazing race around WaikikiHonolulu locals and tourists alike were probably somewhat bemused by the sight of more than 300 Australian personal travel managers (PTMs) and partner suppliers running around the streets of Waikiki on Saturday afternoon, many of them strangely attired and all of them having an inordinate amount of fun. This was TravelManagers’ version of the Amazing Race: a welcome break from the serious business of their annual national conference, which ran for three days over the past weekend.According to TravelManagers’ Executive General Manager, Michael Gazal, the race was designed as a fun, team-building exercise that would allow participants to explore Honolulu, discovering the sights and tourist attractions and seeing for themselves how easy it is to walk and catch public transport around Waikiki.“We had 38 teams of eight or more participants, each of which had a list of up to twelve challenges to complete,” Gazal explains. “These ranged from finding an ice-cream store and buying an ice-cream for a lucky stranger, to photobombing a wedding party.”The teams were given a budget of just USD40 dollars each, which had to cover their transport costs, team costumes and any items they were required to purchase as part of the challenges. Participants were also required to photograph each challenge and post the results to social media, using the conference’s #TM2018HNL hashtag.Prior to heading out on the Amazing Race activity, conference participants had spent the morning engaged in a series of workshops, which included how to use technology to grow their businesses, the importance of creating the right headspace and a wellness workshop presented by Altius Group CEO, Derick Borean.“Having spent a fairly intense morning working on the more cerebral aspects of running a successful business, it was great to get outside and just enjoy each other’s company and the amazing destination we’re in,” says Karin Evert, representative for Strathmore, VIC.After two and a half hours, teams returned to their conference base at the Prince Waikiki to compare experiences at an evening cocktail party.Day Three picked up where Day One left off, with further presentations from PTMs and suppliers. Julie Painter and Michelle Schulze talked about creating ‘Ladies Escapes’: a specialist small-group tour business which has taken a number of groups to Fiji and to Vietnam.“Our successful collaboration has come from sticking to five main principles,” Painter explained to the audience. “1) having strengths and weaknesses that complement each other; 2) understanding that honesty builds trust; 3) the value of brain storming; 4) the importance of supporting each other; 5) the magic of compromise.”For the first time this year, a representative from the National Partnership Office also gave a ‘Secrets of My Success’ presentation. The company’s Digital Marketing Manager, Tania Myles, who claims to have been terrified of travel agents when she started in the industry, talked about landing her “dream job” at TravelManagers.“When you surround yourself with the right people, you understand your worth and what you can achieve,” she explains, adding that the individual success stories to which she has contributed are her biggest motivator.“And I’m not afraid of travel agents anymore!”The conference was formally closed by Gazal at 5pm on Day Three, but not before one of the most eagerly-anticipated presentations of the conference: an address by Turia Pitt.“Turia is one of Australia’s most inspiring and sought-after speakers, so we were absolutely thrilled that she agreed to join us in Hawaii,” says Gazal.Pitt’s story is well-known to many Australians: she suffered burns to 65 percent of her body when caught up in a fire during an ultra-marathon in 2011. After her accident, she decided to focus on what was directly ahead of her instead of looking too far into the future, enduring an arduous journey of rehabilitation to achieve her goal of completing an ironman race.Having started her presentation by asking the group to perform a few squats, Turia went on to explain why she considers an ironman race to be a great metaphor for life: the more you put into it, the more you’ll get out of it.“Turia emphasised that if you can get your mindset right, working for you and not against you, you become unstoppable,” Gazal says.Gazal says Pitt’s presentation provided the ideal note on which to close the conference, which concluded with a gala awards dinner in the Prince Waikiki Pi’inaio Ballroom at the Prince Waikiki.For more information or to speak to someone confidentially about TravelManagers please contact Suzanne Laister on 1800 019 599.Source = TravelManagerslast_img read more

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