NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Full-Time Front Office Specialist at ConcentraFull-Time Sales & Client Service Representative at Cochrane VentilationFull-Time Account Executive 3 at ComcastFull-Time Wireless Retail Sales Associate at SprintFull-Time Food Service Director at Advinia CareFull-Time Manufacturing Technician (Electrical) at AMETEKFull-Time Supervisor of Quality & Documentation Control at Spectra Medical DevicesPart-Time General Laborer at Pepsi Co.Full-Time Software Engineer at Locus RoboticsFull-Time Recruiter at Verizon(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

US gay mayor to launch presidential bid

first_imgSouth Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a meet-and-greet at Madhouse Coffee on 8 April in Las Vegas, Nevada. Photo:AFPPete Buttigieg, the gay, liberal mayor of a small American city in the conservative bastion of Indiana, was expected to officially launch his presidential bid Sunday, joining a crowded field of Democrats vying for their party’s nomination in 2020.The 37-year-old Rhodes scholar and Afghanistan war veteran is the two-term mayor of his hometown of South Bend — a left-leaning bubble in America’s so-called “Rust Belt” region, where the decline of industries such as steel and automobile manufacturing has hurt local economies.Voters in states such as Michigan and Wisconsin helped hand Republican US President Donald Trump his victory in the 2016 election.Buttigieg, who is credited with helping turn South Bend around, has couched himself as a can-do reformer who can speak to voters across the political spectrum.”Here you have this moment, probably the only moment in American history, where it just might make sense for somebody my age, coming from experience in the industrial Midwest, non-federal, different background, bringing something that will actually help Americans,” Buttigieg told NBC’s “Meet The Press” last weekend.Buttigieg was expected to officially launch his candidacy Sunday afternoon in South Bend, giving his already surprisingly strong campaign an additional boost.In the three months since he declared an exploratory committee to test a presidential run, he has gone from relative obscurity to drawing large crowds at campaign stops.He has raised $7 million dollars, more than most other candidates, and jumped to third place in the latest polls of voters in Iowa and New Hampshire — the earliest states to vote in next year’s primary elections.Buttigieg versus PenceThe popular mayor who speaks eight languages and plays classical piano has been the focus of countless news stories and profiles.The fascination has been in no small part due to his background: he would be the youngest, first openly gay, first millennial, and first mayor to become president.He has had headline-grabbing moments, the most recent being his faith-based challenge of Vice President Mike Pence’s views on same-sex marriage and LGBT rights.Former Indiana governor Pence, a religious conservative, infamously supported a 2015 law that was widely interpreted as codifying discrimination against LGBT people. It was quickly changed after nationwide outrage.”Speaking only for myself, I can tell you that if being gay was a choice, it was a choice made far, far above my pay grade,” Buttigieg said in a 7 April speech.”And that’s the thing I wish the Mike Pences of the world would understand, that if you’ve got a problem with who I am, your problem is not with me. Your quarrel, sir, is with my creator.”It was a soundbite-ready moment — like several others he has enjoyed — that replayed throughout the week in American media.Destined for national politicsButtigieg’s Sunday launch event was scheduled to take place at an expansive South Bend building that once housed an assembly plant for defunct auto manufacturer Studebaker.The plant’s closure in 1963 still reverberated in the city in 2011 when he was elected mayor. He set out to tear down decaying, abandoned homes and restore the blighted Studebaker complex to make it suitable for new high-tech companies.In an unlikely feat, the city has reversed decades of population decline and attracted new businesses and development, with the mayor’s popularity growing in the process.”His appeal, for many people in South Bend, is his ability to look forward and to focus on better days ahead,” South Bend-based political science professor Elizabeth Bennion of Indiana University told AFP.”Once people looked at his resume and heard him speak, many started talking about the fact that he was destined for national politics.”last_img read more

With Some Schools Still on Hold Because of Harvey Students Go On

first_img 00:00 /01:00 X Laura IsenseeThird grader Cedric Dupas got to show off his freestyle moves at an interactive hip hop show at Miller Outdoor Theater. He and his classmates at Hilliard Elementary will start their new school year on Monday.Several Houston schools are finally gearing up for back-to-school next week, since Harvey caused extensive damage and delays. But before class starts, some students got a different kind of lesson.That lesson was in the art and culture of Houston hip hop.Video Playerhttps://cdn.hpm.io/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/21131921/WhatsApp-Video-2017-09-21-at-1.16.02-PM.mp400:0000:0000:59Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Dozens of students from Hilliard Elementary in Northeast Houston watched an interactive hip hop show at the Miller Outdoor Theater. Some kids like third grader Cedric Dupas even got on stage.“I feel like awesome, because I danced!” he reported afterwards.It capped off several days of field trips to places like Hermann Park and the Children’s Museum. For teachers it was the first time they’d seen their students this year. “It was nice. The kids was able to get out, get out of the community, you know, since it was destroyed,” said Torrie Taylor, who teaches second grade.Video Playerhttps://cdn.hpm.io/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/21131422/WhatsApp-Video-2017-09-21-at-12.51.33-PM.mp400:0000:0000:52Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.That’s why she said the best part was: “Seeing the kids having fun, smiles on their faces.”Taylor and her students — along with six other Houston schools — will start the year next Monday. Share Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

Could Democrats Really Turn Texas Blue In 2018

first_imgGABRIEL CRISTÓVER PÉREZ/KUT NEWSA town hall at Huston-Tillotson University in Austin, hosted by Indivisible TX 25 East. U.S. Rep. Roger Williams (TX-25) was not present but members of the community carried on with the town hall asking questions of local policy experts and a stand-in forThe last time a Democrat won statewide office in Texas, grunge rock topped the music charts. The state has been solidly red ever since Republican George W. Bush took over from Democrat Ann Richards in the Governor’s mansion. That was more than 20 years ago.Houston Chronicle columnist Erica Grieder is making a bold prediction. She thinks 2018 will be the year Texas turns blue again. She says the election of Donald Trump as president has a lot to do with it.Grieder says the very fact the Republican Party has been in power for so long, and focused so much on keeping its conservative base happy, will likely lead voters to consider Democrats.“We’re seeing discussions of bathroom bills and constitutional carry and sanctuary cities,” she says. “It’s not a kind of a focus on infrastructure, roads, schools.”Grieder says that even though moderates like House Speaker Joe Straus have been frozen out of the GOP, members of the party tell her they think a good year for Democrats would be helpful to Republicans who are less identified with the far-right.“For Democrats to gain a significant number of seats in the legislature or in Congress, will kind of be a wake up call to other Republicans. That they can’t keep doing this,” Grieder says.Grieder says even a single statewide Democratic win could energize the party and its voters toward further gains. She says Democrats have fielded large numbers of candidates for 2018, and she sees more enthusiasm on that side of the aisle.Written by Shelly Brisbin. Sharelast_img read more