Tlicho government takes Ottawa to court in battle over consultation natural resources

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Northwest Territories sits on one of the largest untapped oil and gas reserves in the world and getting at those resources has never been easier thanks to new legislation passed by Ottawa.But as APTN’s Wayne Rivers reports, at least one Indigenous government isn’t pleaed with the new policies and they are going to court to try and stop them.last_img

Closure at busy USMexico border crossing promises headaches

first_imgSAN DIEGO – The busiest border crossing in the United States will close this weekend to the more than 40,000 cars that pass through it daily to Mexico.The closure between San Diego and Tijuana for work on a $741 million expansion project presents a monumental headache for border businesses, workers, tourists and Christopher Enjambre. His band, Minor Gems, plays gigs in Tijuana.“It’s already hectic now, so … damn,” he said, shaking his head in disbelief. “It’s going to be crazy.”Travellers have been enduring hours-long waits on the Mexican side of the border to enter the U.S. with the constant addition of security measures since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.Frequent crossers, like Enjambre, 28, of Chula Vista, south of downtown San Diego, worry they will now face long lines on both sides, making trips through the San Ysidro crossing intolerable.The expansion is believed to be the largest renovation of a crossing along the nearly 2,000-mile-long U.S.-Mexico border. It has been in the works for years to ease congestion and boost cross-border commerce.U.S. officials are warning people to avoid driving to Baja California from 3 a.m. Saturday until noon Monday, hoping to ease what is feared will be a massive traffic jam on the U.S. side as Mexico-bound cars are detoured to the much smaller Otay Mesa crossing to the east.“Don’t even think about going across in a vehicle,” said Jason M-B Wells, executive director of the San Ysidro Chamber of Commerce. “It’s going to be a standstill.”Wells and other business leaders want people to cross on foot and are planning a festival with live music and food trucks to greet those who do. San Ysidro’s pedestrian crossing, where 22 inspection lanes into the U.S. were added this summer, will be open in both directions. The crossing will also remain open on the Mexican side for U.S.-bound cars.Leaders in Baja California’s tourism industry are concerned about the disruption that could continue well past the weekend as some lanes stay closed until November.They already were working to get word out that their tourist spots are safe after the U.S. State Department issued a travel advisory last month that included the region because of violent crime.Ricardo Argiles, CEO of the Rosarito Beach Group, which owns the landmark Rosarito Beach Hotel, said the border closure is a second blow.Reservations for his hotel this weekend are down 30 per cent from last year at this time, and he fears tourism will keep lagging during the construction.Hotels are cutting rates to convince people to still venture south of the border. Rooms at the Rosarito Beach Hotel, once frequented by Hollywood stars like Marilyn Monroe, are going for as low as $60 a night, a 25 per cent drop from last year.The hotel also offers instructions and a Google map on its website that details how to get there after crossing through Otay Mesa.“We hope people still come and once they relax, they forget about the lines,” said Argiles, president of the Hotel and Motel Association of Rosarito Beach.Baja California has been drawing more visitors with growing interest in its picturesque wine country, chic boutique hotels, and booming culinary scene from Tijuana to Ensenada, where restaurants offer Baja-Med cuisine, a blend of Mexican and Mediterranean flavours.The weekend border closure is to allow for the removal of a large metal canopy spanning over all the southbound lanes into Mexico.The crossing will reopen Monday with three southbound lanes while California’s Interstate 5 is realigned to feed into the renovated crossing. U.S. officials expect traffic flows to go back to normal by Thanksgiving, when four of the five lanes at the Western Hemisphere’s largest land crossing will be open.Anthony Kleppe of the U.S. General Services Administration said he is “cautiously optimistic” that the government’s efforts to get the word out about the closure will minimize the hassle.He expects the renovation’s biggest impact to be on the thousands who cross to work and study in San Diego and return each day to their homes in Tijuana.Once complete in summer of 2019, there will be 10 southbound lanes — twice the current number — to handle the estimated 40,000 vehicles that pass through San Ysidro on weekends and 50,000 on weekdays. The expansion also added eight more lanes from Mexico to the United States.last_img read more

Gymboree begins winding down operations after 2nd bankruptcy

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Gymboree is filing for bankruptcy protection for a second time in as many years, but this time the children’s clothing retailer will begin winding down operations for good.The San Francisco company said late Wednesday that it will close all of its Gymboree and Crazy 8 stores, and attempt sell its Janie and Jack business, intellectual property and online business.Gymboree, which began offering classes for mothers and their children in 1976, runs 380 Gymboree stores in the U.S. and Canada. When it first sought Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in June 2017, it ran 1,300 stores.The company has suffered in the post-recession years like almost all mall-based retail stores.Gymboree was bought by the private equity firm Bain Capital for $1.8 billion in 2010 and taken private.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Football Torrance Gibson signs letter of intent with junior college

Former OSU redshirt freshman wide receiver Torrance Gibson (6) carries the ball after a reception during the first half of the spring game. Credit: Alexa MavrogianisOhio State wide receiver Torrance Gibson’s future in Columbus was uncertain following his semester-long suspension before the team began its 2016 season in September. On Tuesday, Gibson expressed his desire to play elsewhere, at least for the near future.Gibson signed a letter of intent with junior-college program Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College. A press release sent from a team’s spokesman said Gibson will enroll in the spring.Although Gibson’s signing does show his interest in playing for the Bulldogs, the letter of intent is not binding, meaning he can continue to search for other options, like from other Division I schools. Gibson is eligible to play in 2017 for MGCCC, but would have to sit out a full season if he were to transfer to another Division I school.Gibson, a native of Plantation, Florida, attended American Heritage School and was a member of the 2015 recruiting class. He came out of high school as a four-star dual-threat quarterback and rated the No. 6 athlete in the class by 247Sports.Gibson redshirted his first year at OSU while undergoing a change from quarterback to wide receiver. Gibson shined in the 2016 spring game, scoring twice. OSU coach Urban Meyer said that the wide receiver was “in the mix” for playing time this year before his suspension.“We are looking forward to having Torrance join our football program,” MGCCC coach Chad Huff said in a press release. “We are confident in his abilities on the field and his character off the field, and we expect him to contribute to our team and the Gulf Coast community.Gibson is expected to play quarterback at MGCCC. He made the switch to receiver with OSU after an already deep group at signal caller forced him to make a change.Editor’s Note 12/13: Gibson’s high school has been corrected to American Heritage School. The Lantern originally published that Gibson attended St. Thomas Aquinas High School. read more

Former Buckeye Cameron Heyward juggles academics preparations for NFL

After lining up a job that guarantees a multimillion-dollar contract, the best benefits an employee can hope for and fame and recognition as the newest member of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ dominant defense, it’d be easy to throw away your textbooks and forget lecture halls ever existed. But former Ohio State defensive end Cameron Heyward isn’t taking the easy way out. Even after being drafted in the first round of last month’s NFL draft, Heyward still attends classes and will graduate with a degree in education at the end of this quarter. The motivation to finish college all comes from within. Heyward knows he wants to earn a degree and do something that has not been done before by anyone in his immediate family. “I’m pushing myself,” Heyward said. “I want to impress my family. I’ll be the first one to graduate and that’s just a big accomplishment.” Now that he’s been drafted, his textbooks aren’t the only books he needs to study. Heyward was fortunate to get a playbook from his Pittsburgh coaching staff, something many draft picks weren’t able to do as a result of the NFL lockout. He said the playbook was the first thing he asked for when he arrived in Pittsburgh on April 29. “The playbook is like a magazine,” Heyward said. “I could read it all day, but I’ve still got to look at my textbooks.” Reading his textbooks might not help him a great deal when he’s studying opposing offenses and which quarterback he’ll be trying to sack on Sundays, but it could end up having a bigger impact sooner than he imagined. If the NFL and NFL Players Association don’t reach an agreement on the labor situation, delaying or canceling the season, Heyward said he will take advantage of the opportunity to complete his student-teaching duties. Heyward would be teaching elementary aged children. “I definitely want to do my student-teaching,” Heyward said. “I didn’t get a chance to do it, and I won’t until after my career. But if I can go into that … that’d be so much fun and that’s truly a dream of mine.” If an agreement is reached and Heyward ends up on the field instead of in the classroom, he will get a chance to return to Pittsburgh, where he’s already been welcomed by some of the town’s biggest celebrities. Heyward said Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger called him and wide receiver Hines Ward sent him a text message to congratulate him. With offensive weapons like Roethlisberger and Ward and a defense that has allowed the fewest points in the league two of the past three seasons, Heyward sees no reason why his new team shouldn’t compete for a championship every year. “I like to think we have the best defensive line in the NFL right now,” Heyward said. “It’s unbelievable. We should be in the Super Bowl every year.” Roethlisberger and Ward won’t be the only ones welcoming Heyward to the Steel City — Heyward was born in Pittsburgh and said he still has a lot of family in the area. “It’s like going back to your old stomping grounds,” he said. “I’m very grateful and I feel blessed to be in this situation. Not a lot of players get to say they’re going somewhere that they actually know a lot about. “I get to see my extended family a little bit more. I’m a big family guy and the chance to see them a little bit more, I love it.” Heyward said he’s “ecstatic” about being a Steeler but that it hasn’t yet hit him full force that he will be playing professional football in his hometown. “I’m just an average kid right now,” he said. “It hasn’t really set in to me that I’m going to be a Pittsburgh Steeler yet.” Heyward is just an average kid who stands 6-foot-5 and pushes 300 pounds, plays defensive end for one of the NFL’s elite franchises and goes to class on weekday mornings. read more

Ohio State mens womens basketball launch seasons at Carrier Classic

Some liken sporting events to wars and battles, but the USS Yorktown has seen and fought in the real thing. Sport will converge with the Yorktown, a decommissioned U.S. Navy aircraft carrier, when the Ohio State men’s and women’s basketball teams will open their 2012-13 seasons against Marquette and Notre Dame, respectively, Friday in the Carrier Classic. Friday’s games, which will take place on a court constructed on the Yorktown’s flight deck, bare no likeness to the battles the warship has seen. Still, OSU coach Thad Matta has an appreciation for the venue’s history. The OSU teams and their opponents’ stay on the ship will last for the duration of the 40-minute basketball games. Retired U.S. Navy Lt. Bob Dorsey, 73, of Milton, Fla., recalled that a typical stay as a sailor on the Yorktown was much longer. Unlike for the basketball teams, a “short” stay, or cruise, on the ship would last six to nine weeks. Long cruises could last six to nine months, and the cruises weren’t for basketball games or other forms of pleasure, but for war. Dorsey, a former helicopter pilot and President of the Yorktown Association, was stationed on the Yorktown from 1963-1966 and was twice deployed to Vietnam and the South China Sea. Following World War II, during which the ship faced bombings and other forms of heavy combat, the Yorktown was modified for rooting out the Soviet submarine threat during the Cold War. When it became evident that there was no threat of Soviet submarines in the seas near Vietnam, Dorsey’s mission changed, he said. “We were doing basic utility work, moving men and cargo from different ships in the South China Sea,” Dorsey said. “We were also doing what was considered coastal surveillance. They would send us out to investigate various shipboard targets that they would pick up on our radar and we would fly out to sea if there was a threat. And so that was our primary mission.” Then, the mission changed again once Vietnam “was going pretty big,” Dorsey said. “A lot of (planes) got shot down, so our mission really changed to being combat rescue,” Dorsey said. “During all that time, we never lost a single helicopter due to combat loss, which was pretty spectacular.” And there were many missions that launched on the sea and saw Dorsey and other members of America venture into Vietnamese airspace. The missions, while thrilling, Dorsey said, were exceedingly dangerous and included night missions at low altitude. “You know, flying off an aircraft carrier is probably one of the most exciting things most people ever do, and I thoroughly enjoyed it,” Dorsey said. “We did a lot of night flying, which was fairly dangerous … generally, helicopters were limited to a maximum altitude of 200 feet. So on a dark night at 200-feet, you really better pay attention.” Obviously, OSU won’t face dangers like what Dorsey saw. The biggest risk the two Buckeyes’ squads run on Friday is starting their respective seasons with a loss. For the men’s team, it would be the first opening-game loss since a 76-65 defeat to San Francisco on Nov. 21, 2003. OSU women’s coach Jim Foster has never lost a season opener since arriving in Columbus for the 2002-03 campaign. Given the Buckeyes teams’ history of opening-night success, some fans in Columbus might be disappointed to miss the opener. The Carrier Classic will take place in Charleston, S.C., some 10 hours from Columbus by car. Buckeye Nation will get to see its team play live at the Schottenstein Center again, though. They will return home. In combat on the Yorktown, Dorsey obviously couldn’t make the same guarantee. “As Navy sailors do,” Dorsey said, “you tell your family, ‘Goodbye. I’ll see you when I get back.’” Matta conveyed appreciation for the sacrifice of the Yorktown’s crews during OSU’s Oct. 11 media day. “(The Carrier Classic is) something that these young men, for the rest of their lives, will remember,” Matta said. “Obviously I want to win the basketball game, but that is one game that is more than the game of basketball. People forget we got guys fighting the war for us right now.” OSU women’s basketball is scheduled to tip off its Carrier Classic game against Notre Dame at 4 p.m. on Friday. The OSU men will tip off against Marquette at 7 p.m. Yorktown takes a starring role The Yorktown has enjoyed Hollywood limelight in her day, having served at the movie set for the movies “The Fighting Lady” and “Tora! Tora! Tora!” (1970). She was also featured in the TV series “Get Smart” (1968) and on the SyFy Channel’s “Ghost Hunters” (2012). Yorktown aids in space exploration On Dec. 27, 1968, the Yorktown recovered the astronauts aboard NASA’s Apollo 8 spacecraft, the first manned spacecraft to travel to the vicinity of Earth’s moon and return safely, according to a Carrier Classic release. Apollo 8 Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot James Lovell and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders splashed down in the Pacific Ocean before a Yorktown helicopter arrived to scoop the astronauts out of the ocean. Michael Periatt contributed to this article. read more

Pellegrini hails Hammers resolve in Cup triumph

first_imgManuel Pellegrini has hailed his players for keeping calm after going a goal down at AFC Wimbledon in the EFL Cup ahead of turning the tie around.Joe Pigott headed the League One side into the lead after just two minutes and hung on until the break despite Rodney McDonald’s dismissal for two yellow cards on 18 minutes.Issa Diop restored parity just after the hour mark before Angelo Ogbonna scored the visitors’ second, with Javier Hernandez sealing the 3-1 win in injury time.“Yes, I was worried because you play against these teams that defend really well and then you are losing 1-0 in the first minutes, after working the whole week not to suffer those kinds of goals,” Pellegrini told Sky Sports News at full time.Report: Rice is committed to West Ham not a United moveReport: Rice is committed to West Ham not a United move George Patchias – September 4, 2019 Declan Rice is committed to his West Ham contract and not a move to Manchester United.In an interview reported by football.london, Rice opens up…“The most important thing was our application to win this game. I was sure if we continued playing that we would score those goals. The best thing the team did tonight was we kept calm, we continued moving and creating space.“It’s important to win. If we lose this game, that’s another consequence – it’s very important. We need to continue working and I hope on Saturday we can have our first victory in the Premier League.”The third-round draw for the EFL Cup will take on Thursday night from 7pm onwardslast_img read more

You are not alone Suicide Awareness And Prevention

first_imgIn addition, KPBSD was awarded a three year Suicide Awareness, Prevention and Postvention (SAPP) grant from the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development. The three year grant proposal targets high risk populations of students in grades 7-12 at Homer Flex, Marathon School, and Kenai Alternative School. And, in year two and three of the grant, additional KPBSD middle and high schools. One of the organizations seeking to offer resources to those in need is within the Kenai Peninsula  Borough School District. The district launched the “You are not alone” suicide awareness and prevention program. More than one thousand students from Kenai Central High School, Kenai Middle School, Nikiski Middle-High School, Skyview Middle School, Soldotna Prep, and Soldotna High School attended assemblies about suicide awareness. Student leaders at KCHS received additional training about suicide awareness. Everyone received yellow wristbands with a Care line that anyone can call, anytime: 877-266-HELP. Another program offered by the district is Sources of Strength. “While suicide is sometimes a difficult topic to discuss, it is also paramount that we as a community address it head on,” said Sean Dusek, superintendent. “Programs such as Sources of Strength are critical components of our commitment and dedication to support our students through the myriad of issues they may experience throughout their lives.”center_img Mental health conditions are often seen as the cause of suicide, but suicide is rarely caused by any single factor. Many people who die by suicide are not known to have a diagnosed mental health condition at the time of death. Problems contributing to suicides include stresses over relationships, housing, money, health, employment, substance abuse, or legal woes. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享As suicide rates continue to increase across the United States and on the Kenai Peninsula, multiple programs and organizations seek to raise awareness about the trend and offer resources to those who need it. Students learned that many people think that openly talking about suicide raises the risk. The fact is that asking someone directly usually lowers their anxiety, opens up lines of communication, and also lowers the risk of an impulsive act.last_img read more

The Wilmington Insider For September 30 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Sunday, September 30, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Sunny, with a high near 67. Northwest wind 3 to 8 mph.In The Community: The Wilmington Farmers Market continues its season from 10am to 1pm on the Swain Green (across from the Town Common). See this week’s lineup HERE.Next Door: U.S. Congressman Seth Moulton, who represents Wilmington and the rest of the the 6th Congressional District of Massachusetts, is holding a Town Hall from 1:45pm to 2:45pm at Tewksbury Town Hall (1009 Main Street, Tewksbury).Next Door:  The Tewksbury Public Events and Celebrations Committee (TPEC) will host its fifth annual Fall Harvest Festival from noon to 5pm at Livingston Fields. TPEC is bringing a variety of food, fun and entertainment for this year’s harvest festival. If you have attended in years past, you will see some familiar faces in Rattlesnake Alley, Wicked Cornhole, and Wicked Cheesy. In addition to live musical entertainment and a couple of wicked Tewksbury businesses, the festival will include a number of craft and food vendors. Carnival rides include round-up, super slide, train ride, and moonwalk. Unlimited-ride bracelets can be purchased for $10 per person — cash only. Kids can ride any ride as often as they like with these bracelets. There will also be pie-eating contests, kids’ crafts, and additional live entertainment. Parking is available at Tewksbury State Hospital with free shuttle buses to the festival. Parking on Livingston Street is limited to vendors, volunteers, handicapped-placarded vehicles.In The Community: The Middlesex Canal Museum and Visitors’ Center (71 Faulkner Street, North Billerica) is open from noon to 4pm.  Learn about the canal, which travels through Wilmington.MBTA Reminder: There will be no weekend commuter rail service on the Lowell Line (Wilmington Center) until December. A free shuttle bus will be available. Learn more HERE.Food Shopping: Food shopping in town this week?  In case you haven’t seen this week’s circulars, Wilmington Apple has you covered:This week’s circular from Market Basket (260 Main Street) can be found HERE.This week’s circular from Lucci’s Market (211 Lowell Street) can be found HERE.Elia’s Country Store (381 Middlesex Avenue) does not have an online circular, but the store posts its hot entree schedule and other specials on its Facebook page HERE.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedThe Wilmington Insider For August 23, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For October 17, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For September 11, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more