Passwordcracking feats at blistering speed shown in Oslo

first_img Explore further Researcher Jeremi Gosney, the founder and CEO of Stricture Consulting Group, was the thinker behind the hardware and software setup that could make 350 billion guesses per second. The result was that eight-character passwords could fall in hours; some passwords could be had in minutes. The deployment that was capable of 350 billion guesses per second was a five-server computer cluster with 25 AMD Radeon graphics cards and virtualization software. The password-penetrating design was able to unleash unexpected speed, ripping through Windows passcodes. Security Ledger runs a detailed account of the rig’s specs and results. According to reports, his approach was enough to brute force eight-character passwords containing upper- and lower-case letters, digits, and symbols, in just hours.The brute forcing algorithms went to work at speeds that are remarkable. He showed that with the right improved software and powerful hardware, such attacks are quite feasible. His setup is only relevant toward offline attacks, where the thief has already retrieved a password database or file. The cluster that he used would not be relevant to online attacks against a live system. His scenario applies to exploits involving collections of leaked or stolen passwords.Gosney’s success, however, in ripping through eight character passwords will only make security professionals that much more aware of what they already know, that older algorithms and shorter length passwords are vulnerable to attacks. System breaches leading to substantial password leaks have been part of news headlines for some time. Gosney said in an email to Ars Technica that “We can attack hashes approximately four times faster than we could previously.” Gosney has been working on clustering approaches for the last four or five years.The GPU cluster in his recent presentation uses a cluster platform to let each card function as if on a single desktop plus ocl-Hashcat Plus.The general rule for computer users is to think about long and strong passwords, between 13 and 20 characters, if possible. If worried about choosing words that are too “common,” users can turn to password management tools, which are designed to help a user create passwords that are less vulnerable. Are you any good at creating passwords? Citation: Password-cracking feats at blistering speed shown in Oslo (2012, December 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-password-cracking-feats-blistering-shown-oslo.html More information: passwords12.at.ifi.uio.no/Jere … _HPC_Passwords12.pdfsecurityledger.com/new-25-gpu- … asswords-in-seconds/www.overclockersclub.com/news/33354/center_img (Phys.org)—Remember when the running advice for password setup was to avoid using your name backwards? My how we have smelled the coffee. A new rig-and-burn presentation for an audience of academics and security professionals at the Passwords^12 Conference in Oslo, Norway, earlier this month, demonstrated that password-cracking is an easy game with crippling amounts of password theft capable of happening at crippling speed. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2012 Phys.orglast_img read more

Thames Water 2OC will deliver power from Londons fatbergs

first_img Explore further Wastewater and water services provider, Thames Water, has signed a 20 year agreement with 2OC. That plant is set to produce 130 Gigawatt hours (GWh) a year of renewable electricity, enough to run 39,000 average-sized homes. (130 GWh is equivalent to the amount of electricity used by 39,394 households in a year based on an average household consumption. Thames Water will buy 75 GWh of this output to run its sewage works and a desalination plant. Remaining power will be available for the national energy supply grid. Other fuel sources include oil wastes from food manufacturers, processors and tallow.Andrew Mercer, chief executive of 2OC, said that when Thames does not need the output, it will be made available to the grid. The power, he said, “will be sourced, generated and used in London by Londoners.” Mercer told the BBC that there would be no smoke and no smell. The plant should be up and running by 2015.Thames water each year removes 80,000 blockages in 109,000km of sewers. Clearing these blockages costs £1 million a month. Credit: Blue Sky Biofuels (Phys.org) —From fish and chips to pork pies, some of London’s tastiest foods create unappetizing and costly fat and oil buildups in drains. These fatbergs, as they are dubbed, end up in the city sewers system. A fatberg is a hefty clump of congealed fat and cooking oil, but also intertwined with other materials passing through the sewers. Leaders at two companies have a plan that, while not making lemonade out of lemons, will do even better, making energy out of leftover fat. Fat and oil from restaurants and build-ups in drains will find re-use as a result of an ambitious plan, it was announced on Sunday. The grease will be fed into what is claimed to be the world’s largest fat-fueled power station, at Beckton in east London, to be run by energy company, 2OC. Britain unveils desalination plant for London reservoirscenter_img © 2013 Phys.org Citation: Thames Water, 2OC will deliver power from London’s fatbergs (2013, April 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-04-thames-2oc-power-london-fatbergs.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

New theory to explain why suns surface rotates slower than its core

first_img Explore further Citation: New theory to explain why sun’s surface rotates slower than its core (2017, February 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-02-theory-sun-surface-rotates-slower.html Scientists have known for some time that the surface of the sun spins more slowly than its interior but have no good explanation for it. In this new effort, the researchers were able to take a better look at what was occurring and by doing so discovered what they believe is the source of the slowdown.To gain a better understanding of what is happening with the sun, the researchers started with images collected by the Solar Dynamics Observatory—a probe that has been circling the sun since 2010. By processing three and a half years of images using filters, the researchers were able to get a detailed look at multiple layers of sun depth, which allowed them to calculate the circulation speed of each. In looking at their overall results, they found that the outermost layer spun more slowly than all of those below it, which spun approximately 5 percent more than the rest of the photosphere.Taking a cue from prior research that has shown that space dust is slowed as it collides with solar photons due to losses from angular momentum, the researchers created a model of the sun in which photons moving outward through interior layers of plasma eventually encounter plasma that is much less dense at its outermost layer. As those photons collide with the plasma, which is moving, angular momentum is exchanged, which results in a net loss of plasma angular momentum. That net loss results in the plasma slowing as the photons that cause the slowdown escape into space. The massive number of such collisions over the course of 4.5 billion years, the team theorizes, has resulted in the slower rate of spin of the outer layer that we observe today. More information: Poynting-Robertson-like Drag at the Sun’s Surface, Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 051102 – Published 3 February 2017 , doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.051102 , On Arxiv: arxiv.org/abs/1612.00873AbstractThe Sun’s internal rotation {Omega}(r,{Theta}) has previously been measured using helioseismology techniques and found to be a complex function of co-latitude, {theta}, and radius, r. From helioseismology and observations of apparently “rooted” solar magnetic tracers we know that the surface rotates more slowly than much of the interior. The cause of this slow-down is not understood but it is important for understanding stellar rotation generally and any plausible theory of the solar interior. A new analysis using 5-min solar p-mode limb oscillations as a rotation “tracer” finds an even larger velocity gradient in a thin region at the top of the photosphere. This shear occurs where the solar atmosphere radiates energy and angular momentum. We suggest that the net effect of the photospheric angular momentum loss is similar to Poynting-Robertson “photon braking” on, for example, Sun-orbiting dust. The resultant photospheric torque is readily computed and, over the Sun’s lifetime, is found to be comparable to the apparent angular momentum deficit in the near-surface shear layer. Journal information: Physical Review Letters , arXiv The Sun by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Credit: NASA (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with the University of Hawaii, Ponta Grossa State University in Brazil and Stanford University has found what they believe is the reason that the surface of the sun rotates more slowly than its core. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team explains how they used a new technique to measure the speed of the sun’s rotation at different depths and what it revealed about the speed of the sun’s outer 70km deep skin. Researchers report possible solution to a long-standing solar mystery © 2017 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

New mirror reflects light differently than conventional mirrors

first_img Journal information: Nano Letters Comparison of microscopic images of the chiral meta-mirror illuminated by right circularly polarized, linear, and left circularly polarized light waves. Credit: Kang et al. ©2017 American Chemical Society When a regular mirror reflects circularly polarized light, it reverses the spin state of the light. In contrast, the chiral meta-mirror preserves one of the two spin states when reflecting circularly polarized light, while absorbing the other spin state. Credit: Kang et al. ©2017 American Chemical Society Breaking metamaterial symmetry with reflected light “We offer the ability to preserve spin states of an optical wave upon reflection from a chiral meta-mirror,” Cai told Phys.org. “In sharp contrast to a regular reflective surface, the chiral meta-mirror operates by absorbing one spin state, while allowing the other to be reflected back with the same spin state as that of the incident wave.” While most conventional mirrors are made of common metals, such as a thin silver film covered by a thicker piece of glass, no known natural material has the chiroptical property exhibited by the new mirror. For this reason, the researchers fabricated the new mirror from an artificial material—a metamaterial with a nanoscale geometry designed specifically to exhibit this property. The meta-mirror consists of a thin film perforated by an array of asymmetric holes, and this asymmetry contributes to the unconventional chiroptical response.”Metamaterials, which offer light manipulation on the nanoscale, can achieve polarization alteration in propagation lengths of just a couple hundred nanometers,” Cai said.The researchers note that the chiral meta-mirror is relatively easy to fabricate, and they expect that it will have applications in optical data transmission and other technologies that they plan to further investigate in the future.”Some of the most common ways to send data via optical means is by time-division or wavelength multiplexing,” Cai said. “However, as the demand for increasing data bandwidths grows, a higher degree of multiplexing is needed. In terms of optical communications, polarization control opens another paradigm for multiplexing and data handling. The ability of our meta-mirror to preserve an incident spin state will aid in the development of these polarization-sensitive systems.”Chiral meta-mirrors can also be used for applications in chiroptical sensing, chiral signal analysis, and may even play a part in the next generation of 3-D movies. Most 3-D movies rely on the left and right handedness of the circularly polarized light that passes through the glasses that we wear in the theaters. With this polarization distinction at hand, chiral meta-mirrors could even find utility in this industry.” Citation: New mirror reflects light differently than conventional mirrors (2017, November 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-11-mirror-differently-conventional-mirrors.html Explore further More information: Lei Kang et al. “Preserving Spin States upon Reflection: Linear and Nonlinear Responses of a Chiral Meta-Mirror.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b03882 © 2017 Phys.org The researchers, led by Wenshan Cai at the Georgia Institute of Technology, have published a paper on the chiral meta-mirror in a recent issue of Nano Letters.The unconventional reflective properties of the new mirror arise from the way in which the mirror responds to light that is circularly polarized. Light waves are composed of electric and magnetic fields, and when the electric field travels slightly behind the magnetic field or vice versa, the light wave moves along a helical path through time, and this is called circularly polarized light. Most of the light around us, such as light from the sun and lightbulbs, is unpolarized but can become polarized by passing through a polarization filter.A circularly polarized light wave can travel in either a clockwise (right) or counterclockwise (left) fashion, which is determined by an intrinsic physical property of light called the spin angular momentum and, consequently, is called the spin state of light. The main difference between the new mirror and conventional mirrors is how each responds to the spin states of circularly polarized light.When a circularly polarized light beam reaches a conventional mirror, the mirror reverses the beam’s spin state, so that the light it reflects back out has the opposite spin as the light that enters. For many applications, this property does not pose any problems, and in fact mirrors are one of the most important components of many optical devices. However, for certain new applications such as photonic information processing in which the spin states of light carry data, it is important to maintain and control the spin states when reflected by mirrors.The new chiral meta-mirror does almost the opposite of a conventional mirror with respect to spin states. Instead of reflecting the opposite spin state, it reflects the same spin state of an incident circularly polarized beam, but only for one spin state. When a beam with the opposite spin state arrives at the mirror, the mirror completely absorbs that light. So the final result is that the mirror reflects only light with one spin state—either left or right circularly polarized beams, but not both. (Phys.org)—Researchers have designed a new type of mirror that reflects light in a completely different way than conventional mirrors do. The new mirror, called a chiral meta-mirror, has potential applications for information processing with light, next-generation 3-D movies, and other technologies that manipulate light in novel ways. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Universal basic income experiment made people happier but not more likely to

first_img Europeans receptive to new welfare policy ideas Credit: CC0 Public Domain More information: julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/bi … quence=1&isAllowed=y Explore further Citation: Universal basic income experiment made people happier but not more likely to get a job (2019, February 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-universal-basic-income-people-happier.html The experiment carried out by the government tested the idea of a concept called universal basic income (UBI), which guarantees participants a certain basic standard of living via direct cash transfer. The standard of living guaranteed includes reasonably nice housing, sufficient food, proper health care, and a means for engaging with the surrounding community. UBI is an idea that has been kicked around and tested before, but thus far, findings have produced mixed results. In this new experiment, the Finnish government randomly chose 2,000 people who were receiving unemployment benefits and offered them a roughly equal sum without the attendant job search requirements. Normally, there are also restrictions on how the money can be used. Subjects in the experiment were given free rein—they could live on the dole with no worries, and they would keep receiving their money even if they got a job. The experiment lasted from the beginning of January in 2017 until the end of December 2018. The results of the experiment have been widely anticipated as polls show that most people believe UBI would make people less interested in finding a job.The government asked the volunteers how they were doing during the experiment via questionnaire. Over half reported that their heath was either good or very good. In contrast, just 46 percent of a control group said the same. The UBI participants also scored higher when reporting trust levels in the government and when asked about their future outlook. In general, the FSII report concluded that overall welfare for those participating in the UBI experiment was higher than for the control group. But there was also a downside. Unemployment for those in the UBI experiment remained at basically the same levels as for the control group. © 2019 Science X Network Finland’s Social Insurance Institution (FSII) has published the results of an income experiment it carried out for two years to learn more about ways to reduce unemployment. They report that their experiment showed that giving unemployed people a no-strings-attached guaranteed income instead of an unemployment allowance made them happier and less stressed—but it did not make them any more or less likely to get a job. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Get louder

first_imgBacardi and Only Much Louder bring you the fourth edition of the festival featuring more than 200 bands across six stages. All set to take over the Capital on 30 Nov and 1 Dec, Millennium Post talks to Nischay Parekh and Prateek Kuhad who will be a part of the madness…NISCHAY PAREKH: How did your journey with music begin?My first ever brush with music was my mother’s cassette collection. I had the Beatles, Stevie Wonder, Frank Sinatra and Marvin Gaye and my world was changed forever, I just didn’t know it yet. I started playing and writing songs at 11. Once the songs started coming, I knew that this is what I had to do with my life. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Tell us about your album, Ocean.Ocean is an experimental pop album filled with playful orchestration and cinematic moments. In terms of sound it’s very lush and I’m very proud of the production. The songs themselves are about relationships, longing and other very universal themes. However, I enjoy making these larger than life themes very intimate, that’s why you’ll find pandas, ghosts and secrets in my Ocean.Your most memorable gig?The Pune edition of Bacardi NH7 Weekender a few weeks ago. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixCould you give us a little insight of your set at Bacardi NH7 Weekender?The live experience at the Bacardi NH7 Weekenders will be intimate, interactive and full of colour. We have a surprise in store for the audience as well. Our mission is to create a very special experience for everyone. Immersing people into the story that music is telling is of prime importance. Bring your imagination.What is your take on Bacardi NH7 Weekender shaping music in India? Bacardi NH7 Weekender just injects the Indian scene with huge amounts of positive energy. It creates a vibe like no other.Besides music, tell us something more about Nischay Parekh?I love television, food and reading. Outside of music I’m a pretty ordinary guy.PRATEEK KUHAD: Which bands/musicians have been the biggest influences on your music?Musically, especially my guitar playing is influenced a lot by Nick Drake, John Mayer, Elliot Smith and The Tallest Man On Earth. What I love about all these artists is their incredible ability to write the most amazing songs, both musically and lyrically. I aspire to do the same.What can we expect from your set at Bacardi NH7 Weekender in Delhi?I’m playing at all four editions of Bacardi NH7 Weekender (Pune, Delhi, Bangalore and Kolkata), so there’s a lot to be brought to the table. You’ll just have to come to the gigs and find out for yourself!last_img read more

Document surfaces outlining Pietersens misbehavior

first_imgKevin Pietersen’s monopoly of the airwaves and printed media regarding his claims of bullying in the England cricket team’s dressingroom ended abruptly on Tuesday with the leaking of an email outlining his poor behaviour on last year’s disastrous Ashes series in Australia.The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) insisted the email website Cricinfo had received was not the official dossier compiled by former coach Andy Flower, who has like many others not escaped the wrath of Pietersen in his book. Also Read – Khel Ratna for Deepa and Bajrang, Arjuna for JadejaThe ECB said it was an internal email draft drawn up by their lawyers — marked strictly privileged and confidential.Neverthless it will not make pleasant reading for the South African-born batsman but will delight those who like former England spinner Graeme Swann and wicketkeeper Matt Prior have been lambasted by Pietersen.However, Pietersen brushed off the email’s contents which included captain Alastair Cook’s first name being misspelt in one instance.last_img read more

Forest dept to put cork on use of plastic in parks

first_imgKolkata: The state Forest department is going to impose some restrictions on the usage of plastic material in the parks that are owned by the department.During a programme organised on the occasion of World Environment Day at Central Park in Salt Lake, state Forest minister Binay Krishna Burman said that the visitors will not be allowed to enter parks with any plastic items or bags. During the programme, some saplings were planted in the park while some others were distributed among the people by the Forest department. The principal secretary of the department Chandan Sinha was also present at the programme. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsBurman said that his department will impose restrictions on the entry of people who are carrying plastic substances. The step has been taken to protect the environment of the parks. It is often seen that people dump plastic bags and other items in the waterbodies inside the parks, which in turn cause damage to the animals and plants in the water.The minister also instructed the senior officials of his department to carry out extensive campaigns against the use of plastic items, which disrupt the ecological balance. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedVarious awareness programmes would be held by the department to make people aware about the ill effects of the plastic items. He also urged the people to plant more trees in their neighbourhood, which is one of the steps to keep the nature intact.The Forest department would also urge the stalls situating near the parks not to sell plastic items to the people. It may be mentioned here that the Forest department often distributes saplings among the people for protection of the environment.last_img read more