Fraudster jailed for 3 years

first_imgTwenty-four-year-old Jermaine Fraser of Lamaha Springs, Georgetown was on Thursday sentenced to three years’ imprisonment by Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan when he appeared in her court charged with four counts of fraud.Fraser pleaded guilty to three of the four charges.The court heard that on April 26, 2018, while in the vicinity of Georgetown, Fraser collected the sum of $400,000 from Baldeo Puran by pretending he was in a position to acquire for Puran a Toyota 212 motorcar, knowing same to be false. He pleaded guilty to this charge.Another charge stated that on May, 4, 2018, while in the vicinity of Lombard Street, Georgetown, he obtained the sum of $300,000 from Ashmi Singh by pretending that he was in a position to acquire a bus for Singh, knowing same to be false. Again, he admitted to this charge.Fraser admitted that on June 29, 2018, at Charlotte Street, Lacytown, he obtained the sum of $200,000 from Floyde LaFleur by falsely pretending that he was in a position to acquire a minibus for him.But he denied that, on July 31, 2018, he fraudulently obtained $1.4 million from Damian Persaud by pretending he was in a position to acquire a car for Persaud.After considering an early mitigation plea, the Chief Magistrate sentenced Fraser to three terms of imprisonment, and ordered that the sentences run concurrently.Fraser will make his next court appearance later in August, to answer to the allegations made by Damian Persaud, which he has denied.last_img read more

Photos from the Olympic Torch Relay in Fort St. John

first_imgBelow is a slide show of photos from the Olympic Torch Relay in Fort St. John on Sunday January 31st, 2010.  Do you have photos or video you’d like to share from the event? E-mail [email protected] Advertisement –last_img

No Consensus on Scientific Consensus

first_imgHow much do you trust scientific experts?  Most of the scientific experts expect us to trust them.  They are appalled when lay people express doubts about matters the consensus of experts take for granted.  Yet others tell us we should doubt.  There seems to be no consensus about whether to trust the scientific consensus.    Science Daily reproduced a study from the University of Michigan that concluded, “Women More Likely Than Men to Accept Scientific Consensus on Global Warming.”  That begs the question of which gender should accept the scientific consensus.  It was partially answered in a quote, “women underestimate their scientific knowledge” – i.e., the women who accept the consensus must be the more scientifically reasonable ones.   PhysOrg reproduced a study by Yale University law professor Dan Kahan and friends who tried to figure out “Why ‘scientific consensus’ fails to persuade.”  The hidden subtext is that the consensus should persuade, because it’s scientific, but that people, who are unscientific (i.e., dumb) tend to only agree with the consensus when it matches their own biases.  People are “threatened” by scientific findings that contradict their beliefs, the article intimated, so they must be shmoozed into the accepting the findings by means of non-threatening ways of framing the information.  One colleague explained, “To make sure people form unbiased perceptions of what scientists are discovering, it is necessary to use communication strategies that reduce the likelihood that citizens of diverse values will find scientific findings threatening to their cultural commitments,” which presumably include religious beliefs.    One of the skeptics about consensus (more or less) is Anthony Gottlieb.  Writing for Intelligent Life magazine, he reviewed two books: Science: A Four Thousand Year History by Patricia Fara (2009) and Wrong: Why Experts Keep Failing Us—And How to Know When Not to Trust Them by David Freedman.  On the one hand, Gottlieb provided plenty of entertaining examples of the scientific consensus being flat wrong, and recognized that most of today’s consensus beliefs are likely to be flat wrong in 100 years.  But on the other hand, he pigeonholed crackpots into strange bedfellows: “the deniers of evolution, or the devotees of homeopathic medicine, or people who believe that childhood vaccinations cause autism” whom he lumped together as “demonstrably mistaken as anyone can be….”  Is it because the scientific consensus feels that way that he said this, or has he performed his own controlled experiments?  However he decided to lump these groups together, it could be called a form of the association fallacy.    Scientists and science journalists who buck the consensus are sometimes called mavericks.  They are legitimate scientists or journalists, but they sometimes have to exercise personal and moral courage to hold their ground against the majority.  A recent example was told in Columbia Journalism Review.  Pallava Bagla was an Indian journalist who broke the news that the IPCC had provided false information about the rate of glacial melt in India in their famous report.  At the time, this was a career-limiting move for Bagla, who faced trepidation and the threat of ostracism for revealing the error at a very politically inopportune time (right before the Copenhagen Summit) – and he did initially get ridiculed by the head of the IPCC.  Later, that same head apologized, and Bagla ended up getting a journalism award for his daring.    The idea of consensus loomed large in Robert Crowther’s recent entry on Evolution News and Views, “Academic Elites Don’t Appreciate Uppity Scientists Who Buck the Consensus.”  Discussing the risk that independent thinkers take when challenging orthodoxy, Crowther said, “The average scientist can find lots of fruitful areas of research that won’t get her in hot water with the pointy-headed elites who’s [sic] all-seeing academic eyes keep a watch out for anything that is out of line with the current orthodoxy.”  At least that’s how some of Gottlieb’s “deniers of evolution” feel about it.We’ve harped on consensus many times, so no long reruns here, but science is supposed to be about truth based on evidence, not majority rule.  There are times when a consensus, with its presumed authority of the collective, can actually hold back scientific progress (e.g., 04/30/2009).  This is especially true for areas of science that are inference-based and non-repeatable.  Recall novelist Michael Crichton’s blistering attack in 2003 to a Caltech audience on the notion of consensus (12/27/2003); the whole address is available in PDF form from Stephen Schneider’s Stanford website.    The philosophy of science of the pro-consensus reporters is appallingly shallow.  They picture scientists as ruling elites, the Knowers of the Culture, and lay people as ignorant scum.  There’s plenty of scum to go around.  It’s not only lay people who have cultural biases.  Those biases are nearly impregnable in certain “scientific” circles and situations.  Science becomes corrupt when it demands allegiance on the basis of sheer numbers or authority.  Remember that one of the great physicists of the 20th century, Richard Feynman, joked that “Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.”    For a good introduction to philosophy of science that reveals the difficulty of establishing infallible trust in the scientific community, we recommend again Dr. Jeffrey Kasser’s lecture series (see 04/18/2009 Resource of the Week) and Dr. Stephen Goldman’s lecture series, Science Wars (12/19/2009 Resource).  Even if you have no reason to doubt the consensus, at least be knowledgeable of the philosophical issues involved.  Without a doubt, many scientists are honest and above reproach, particularly in the less politically-charged areas of research.  Many scientists are sincerely looking for the truth.  So are many in the public.  You could be, too.  Orient yourself to truth, not consensus.    Related reading:   See also the 11/25/2008 entry for examples of how wacky some scientific ideas can become, the 11/15/2010 entry on the inertia of specious theories, the 03/17/2006 on ways scientific journals can perpetuate false ideas, and the 04/02/2010 commentary for a list of 30 factors that can distort consensus science into groupthink.  Other commentaries on philosophy of science can be found at 05/13/2010, 04/30/2009, 10/29/2008, 06/28/2008 on “Yellow Science”, 08/13/2007, 03/19/2007.  More can be found using the search phrase, “philosophy of science”.  Lest you think it doesn’t matter, keep in mind this maxim from Greg Bahnsen: “Everyone does philosophy, but not everyone does it well.”  Know what you believe – and why you believe it.(Visited 38 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Key issues from Mo Ibrahim Index 2012

first_imgThe Mo Ibrahim Index, currently in its 6th year, released its annual report on African governance on the 15th of October 2012. This year South Africa remains in the fifth position it has occupied since the index launched in 2006. In terms of the methodology the Mo Ibrahim Foundation deploys it is necessary to note that it is a composite index. The index is constructed by combining underlying indicators in a standardised way to provide a statistical measure of governance performance in African countries.Key Issues [PDF, 383Kb]last_img

Bengal football’s Big Three are in terminal decline

first_imgMohammedan sporting practises at its ground in KolkataIn a nation where foreign football is gaining popularity, Bengal’s Holy Trinity of Mohun Bagan, East Bengal and Mohammedan Sporting seem to have scored self-goals. Local nurseries of talent are drying up, forcing club managements, which haven’t corporatised despite promising to do so,,Mohammedan sporting practises at its ground in KolkataIn a nation where foreign football is gaining popularity, Bengal’s Holy Trinity of Mohun Bagan, East Bengal and Mohammedan Sporting seem to have scored self-goals. Local nurseries of talent are drying up, forcing club managements, which haven’t corporatised despite promising to do so, to rely heavily on foreign recruits to pull in the crowds. The results are evident. Sporting is now among the also-rans, relegated to the all-India second division football league. Mohun Bagan has not won the national league in a decade. And East Bengal last won it in 2003.Till the 1980s, most of Bengal’s best known footballers came from suburban towns such as Naihati, Baruipur and Amta. These places hardly churn out good footballers anymore. “Too much emphasis on cricket has meant that the average Bengali boy is not taking to football,” laments Sukumar Samajpati, ace India right-winger of the 1960s. “The infrastructure is poor,” says Trevor Morgan, the British coach hired by East Bengal in July 2010. “There has to be investment in infrastructure, in setting up football academies and spotting and grooming talent at an early age,” he says.Clubs have had to compensate with big-ticket foreign players and footballers from other states. “Getting foreigners is the best way to impress the members of a club. There’s no alternative,” says former Indian captain Bhaichung Bhutia. The East Bengal squad for the 2011-2012 season, unveiled on August 8, features only nine locals on a list of 34. Mohun Bagan has 10 locals on a list of 33 players. Only Mohammedan Sporting has a majority of locals in its 21-member squad, but that’s because it has little money. “Mohammedan evokes a negative response from most sponsors,” says Sultan Ahmed, club president.advertisementA consortium of officials continues to run the three clubs. Mohun Bagan and East Bengal’s managements have remained unchanged for seven years and more than 10 years respectively. An 18-member executive committee has governed Mohammedan Sporting’s affairs for more than a decade. Contrast this with Goa, a state whose clubs have had major success in recent years. Goan clubs like Churchill Brothers, Salgaocar and Dempo are corporate entities and listed on stock exchanges.”Football in Bengal is still big, but you won’t win a thing without foreign players. The trend will continue if you do not look at nursing homegrown talent. Unless the bottom is sound, the top will continue to suffer,” says East Bengal coach Morgan.last_img read more

Former Buckeye Cameron Heyward juggles academics preparations for NFL

After lining up a job that guarantees a multimillion-dollar contract, the best benefits an employee can hope for and fame and recognition as the newest member of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ dominant defense, it’d be easy to throw away your textbooks and forget lecture halls ever existed. But former Ohio State defensive end Cameron Heyward isn’t taking the easy way out. Even after being drafted in the first round of last month’s NFL draft, Heyward still attends classes and will graduate with a degree in education at the end of this quarter. The motivation to finish college all comes from within. Heyward knows he wants to earn a degree and do something that has not been done before by anyone in his immediate family. “I’m pushing myself,” Heyward said. “I want to impress my family. I’ll be the first one to graduate and that’s just a big accomplishment.” Now that he’s been drafted, his textbooks aren’t the only books he needs to study. Heyward was fortunate to get a playbook from his Pittsburgh coaching staff, something many draft picks weren’t able to do as a result of the NFL lockout. He said the playbook was the first thing he asked for when he arrived in Pittsburgh on April 29. “The playbook is like a magazine,” Heyward said. “I could read it all day, but I’ve still got to look at my textbooks.” Reading his textbooks might not help him a great deal when he’s studying opposing offenses and which quarterback he’ll be trying to sack on Sundays, but it could end up having a bigger impact sooner than he imagined. If the NFL and NFL Players Association don’t reach an agreement on the labor situation, delaying or canceling the season, Heyward said he will take advantage of the opportunity to complete his student-teaching duties. Heyward would be teaching elementary aged children. “I definitely want to do my student-teaching,” Heyward said. “I didn’t get a chance to do it, and I won’t until after my career. But if I can go into that … that’d be so much fun and that’s truly a dream of mine.” If an agreement is reached and Heyward ends up on the field instead of in the classroom, he will get a chance to return to Pittsburgh, where he’s already been welcomed by some of the town’s biggest celebrities. Heyward said Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger called him and wide receiver Hines Ward sent him a text message to congratulate him. With offensive weapons like Roethlisberger and Ward and a defense that has allowed the fewest points in the league two of the past three seasons, Heyward sees no reason why his new team shouldn’t compete for a championship every year. “I like to think we have the best defensive line in the NFL right now,” Heyward said. “It’s unbelievable. We should be in the Super Bowl every year.” Roethlisberger and Ward won’t be the only ones welcoming Heyward to the Steel City — Heyward was born in Pittsburgh and said he still has a lot of family in the area. “It’s like going back to your old stomping grounds,” he said. “I’m very grateful and I feel blessed to be in this situation. Not a lot of players get to say they’re going somewhere that they actually know a lot about. “I get to see my extended family a little bit more. I’m a big family guy and the chance to see them a little bit more, I love it.” Heyward said he’s “ecstatic” about being a Steeler but that it hasn’t yet hit him full force that he will be playing professional football in his hometown. “I’m just an average kid right now,” he said. “It hasn’t really set in to me that I’m going to be a Pittsburgh Steeler yet.” Heyward is just an average kid who stands 6-foot-5 and pushes 300 pounds, plays defensive end for one of the NFL’s elite franchises and goes to class on weekday mornings. read more

Ohio State mens womens basketball launch seasons at Carrier Classic

Some liken sporting events to wars and battles, but the USS Yorktown has seen and fought in the real thing. Sport will converge with the Yorktown, a decommissioned U.S. Navy aircraft carrier, when the Ohio State men’s and women’s basketball teams will open their 2012-13 seasons against Marquette and Notre Dame, respectively, Friday in the Carrier Classic. Friday’s games, which will take place on a court constructed on the Yorktown’s flight deck, bare no likeness to the battles the warship has seen. Still, OSU coach Thad Matta has an appreciation for the venue’s history. The OSU teams and their opponents’ stay on the ship will last for the duration of the 40-minute basketball games. Retired U.S. Navy Lt. Bob Dorsey, 73, of Milton, Fla., recalled that a typical stay as a sailor on the Yorktown was much longer. Unlike for the basketball teams, a “short” stay, or cruise, on the ship would last six to nine weeks. Long cruises could last six to nine months, and the cruises weren’t for basketball games or other forms of pleasure, but for war. Dorsey, a former helicopter pilot and President of the Yorktown Association, was stationed on the Yorktown from 1963-1966 and was twice deployed to Vietnam and the South China Sea. Following World War II, during which the ship faced bombings and other forms of heavy combat, the Yorktown was modified for rooting out the Soviet submarine threat during the Cold War. When it became evident that there was no threat of Soviet submarines in the seas near Vietnam, Dorsey’s mission changed, he said. “We were doing basic utility work, moving men and cargo from different ships in the South China Sea,” Dorsey said. “We were also doing what was considered coastal surveillance. They would send us out to investigate various shipboard targets that they would pick up on our radar and we would fly out to sea if there was a threat. And so that was our primary mission.” Then, the mission changed again once Vietnam “was going pretty big,” Dorsey said. “A lot of (planes) got shot down, so our mission really changed to being combat rescue,” Dorsey said. “During all that time, we never lost a single helicopter due to combat loss, which was pretty spectacular.” And there were many missions that launched on the sea and saw Dorsey and other members of America venture into Vietnamese airspace. The missions, while thrilling, Dorsey said, were exceedingly dangerous and included night missions at low altitude. “You know, flying off an aircraft carrier is probably one of the most exciting things most people ever do, and I thoroughly enjoyed it,” Dorsey said. “We did a lot of night flying, which was fairly dangerous … generally, helicopters were limited to a maximum altitude of 200 feet. So on a dark night at 200-feet, you really better pay attention.” Obviously, OSU won’t face dangers like what Dorsey saw. The biggest risk the two Buckeyes’ squads run on Friday is starting their respective seasons with a loss. For the men’s team, it would be the first opening-game loss since a 76-65 defeat to San Francisco on Nov. 21, 2003. OSU women’s coach Jim Foster has never lost a season opener since arriving in Columbus for the 2002-03 campaign. Given the Buckeyes teams’ history of opening-night success, some fans in Columbus might be disappointed to miss the opener. The Carrier Classic will take place in Charleston, S.C., some 10 hours from Columbus by car. Buckeye Nation will get to see its team play live at the Schottenstein Center again, though. They will return home. In combat on the Yorktown, Dorsey obviously couldn’t make the same guarantee. “As Navy sailors do,” Dorsey said, “you tell your family, ‘Goodbye. I’ll see you when I get back.’” Matta conveyed appreciation for the sacrifice of the Yorktown’s crews during OSU’s Oct. 11 media day. “(The Carrier Classic is) something that these young men, for the rest of their lives, will remember,” Matta said. “Obviously I want to win the basketball game, but that is one game that is more than the game of basketball. People forget we got guys fighting the war for us right now.” OSU women’s basketball is scheduled to tip off its Carrier Classic game against Notre Dame at 4 p.m. on Friday. The OSU men will tip off against Marquette at 7 p.m. Yorktown takes a starring role The Yorktown has enjoyed Hollywood limelight in her day, having served at the movie set for the movies “The Fighting Lady” and “Tora! Tora! Tora!” (1970). She was also featured in the TV series “Get Smart” (1968) and on the SyFy Channel’s “Ghost Hunters” (2012). Yorktown aids in space exploration On Dec. 27, 1968, the Yorktown recovered the astronauts aboard NASA’s Apollo 8 spacecraft, the first manned spacecraft to travel to the vicinity of Earth’s moon and return safely, according to a Carrier Classic release. Apollo 8 Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot James Lovell and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders splashed down in the Pacific Ocean before a Yorktown helicopter arrived to scoop the astronauts out of the ocean. Michael Periatt contributed to this article. read more

Christian Eriksen Spurs need to get back on track immediately

first_imgTottenham playmaker Christian Eriksen has urged the team to bounce back immediately after their 100% start to the season ended in a 2-1 loss to Watford on SundayThe Lilywhites went ahead at Vicarage Road through Abdoulaye Doucoure’s own goal in the first half.But headers from Troy Deeney and Craig Cathcart handed Watford all three points and maintained their 100 per cent start to the season, whilst ending Spurs’ in the process.“We’re very disappointed,” Eriksen told the club website.“We want and expect to win every game and losing is not something we often do, luckily.“We need to get back on track and do that against Liverpool. That’s the perfect occasion to come back and we’ll do that.”Cristiano Ronaldo, Nemanja Vidic, Manchester UnitedVidic: “Ronaldo is the most professional footballer I’ve seen” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Nemanja Vidic opened up on how a 21-year-old Cristiano Ronaldo’s professionalism left him stunned at Manchester United.Sunday’s defeat was Spurs’ first in the Premier League for 43 games after taking the lead, which last came back in November 2016 against Chelsea.“It’s not something that often happens to us,” said Eriksen.“That’s what everyone felt, everyone had the feeling that they were not going to score but they got a free-kick in a dangerous place, a decent cross and a good header,” he added.“We had chances, didn’t finish the game and they scored from two set-pieces – we can’t be satisfied with that.“The result against United (3-0 last week) was exceptional but we’re down to earth again. This is football, anything can happen in any game, it goes so quickly with ups and downs.”Spurs will next face Liverpool at Wembley on September 15.last_img read more