Football Torrance Gibson signs letter of intent with junior college

Former OSU redshirt freshman wide receiver Torrance Gibson (6) carries the ball after a reception during the first half of the spring game. Credit: Alexa MavrogianisOhio State wide receiver Torrance Gibson’s future in Columbus was uncertain following his semester-long suspension before the team began its 2016 season in September. On Tuesday, Gibson expressed his desire to play elsewhere, at least for the near future.Gibson signed a letter of intent with junior-college program Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College. A press release sent from a team’s spokesman said Gibson will enroll in the spring.Although Gibson’s signing does show his interest in playing for the Bulldogs, the letter of intent is not binding, meaning he can continue to search for other options, like from other Division I schools. Gibson is eligible to play in 2017 for MGCCC, but would have to sit out a full season if he were to transfer to another Division I school.Gibson, a native of Plantation, Florida, attended American Heritage School and was a member of the 2015 recruiting class. He came out of high school as a four-star dual-threat quarterback and rated the No. 6 athlete in the class by 247Sports.Gibson redshirted his first year at OSU while undergoing a change from quarterback to wide receiver. Gibson shined in the 2016 spring game, scoring twice. OSU coach Urban Meyer said that the wide receiver was “in the mix” for playing time this year before his suspension.“We are looking forward to having Torrance join our football program,” MGCCC coach Chad Huff said in a press release. “We are confident in his abilities on the field and his character off the field, and we expect him to contribute to our team and the Gulf Coast community.Gibson is expected to play quarterback at MGCCC. He made the switch to receiver with OSU after an already deep group at signal caller forced him to make a change.Editor’s Note 12/13: Gibson’s high school has been corrected to American Heritage School. The Lantern originally published that Gibson attended St. Thomas Aquinas High School. read more

Former Buckeye Cameron Heyward juggles academics preparations for NFL

After lining up a job that guarantees a multimillion-dollar contract, the best benefits an employee can hope for and fame and recognition as the newest member of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ dominant defense, it’d be easy to throw away your textbooks and forget lecture halls ever existed. But former Ohio State defensive end Cameron Heyward isn’t taking the easy way out. Even after being drafted in the first round of last month’s NFL draft, Heyward still attends classes and will graduate with a degree in education at the end of this quarter. The motivation to finish college all comes from within. Heyward knows he wants to earn a degree and do something that has not been done before by anyone in his immediate family. “I’m pushing myself,” Heyward said. “I want to impress my family. I’ll be the first one to graduate and that’s just a big accomplishment.” Now that he’s been drafted, his textbooks aren’t the only books he needs to study. Heyward was fortunate to get a playbook from his Pittsburgh coaching staff, something many draft picks weren’t able to do as a result of the NFL lockout. He said the playbook was the first thing he asked for when he arrived in Pittsburgh on April 29. “The playbook is like a magazine,” Heyward said. “I could read it all day, but I’ve still got to look at my textbooks.” Reading his textbooks might not help him a great deal when he’s studying opposing offenses and which quarterback he’ll be trying to sack on Sundays, but it could end up having a bigger impact sooner than he imagined. If the NFL and NFL Players Association don’t reach an agreement on the labor situation, delaying or canceling the season, Heyward said he will take advantage of the opportunity to complete his student-teaching duties. Heyward would be teaching elementary aged children. “I definitely want to do my student-teaching,” Heyward said. “I didn’t get a chance to do it, and I won’t until after my career. But if I can go into that … that’d be so much fun and that’s truly a dream of mine.” If an agreement is reached and Heyward ends up on the field instead of in the classroom, he will get a chance to return to Pittsburgh, where he’s already been welcomed by some of the town’s biggest celebrities. Heyward said Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger called him and wide receiver Hines Ward sent him a text message to congratulate him. With offensive weapons like Roethlisberger and Ward and a defense that has allowed the fewest points in the league two of the past three seasons, Heyward sees no reason why his new team shouldn’t compete for a championship every year. “I like to think we have the best defensive line in the NFL right now,” Heyward said. “It’s unbelievable. We should be in the Super Bowl every year.” Roethlisberger and Ward won’t be the only ones welcoming Heyward to the Steel City — Heyward was born in Pittsburgh and said he still has a lot of family in the area. “It’s like going back to your old stomping grounds,” he said. “I’m very grateful and I feel blessed to be in this situation. Not a lot of players get to say they’re going somewhere that they actually know a lot about. “I get to see my extended family a little bit more. I’m a big family guy and the chance to see them a little bit more, I love it.” Heyward said he’s “ecstatic” about being a Steeler but that it hasn’t yet hit him full force that he will be playing professional football in his hometown. “I’m just an average kid right now,” he said. “It hasn’t really set in to me that I’m going to be a Pittsburgh Steeler yet.” Heyward is just an average kid who stands 6-foot-5 and pushes 300 pounds, plays defensive end for one of the NFL’s elite franchises and goes to class on weekday mornings. read more

Tall Pines MP predicts resounding win for PLP

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, April 18, 2017 – Nassau – The PLP predicts it will win 23 seats in the upcoming General Election; the Opposition parties will get the remaining 16 says Leslie Miller, the incumbent for Tall Pines.During the family fun day held by the Progressive Liberal Party at Clifford Park yesterday, Miller made the call even as the Parliamentary Registration Department revealed that 174,070 people have registered to vote.   Tall Pines falls within the top 10 constituencies with the most registered voters.#MagneticMediaNews#MillerpredictswinforTallPines Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #MillerpredictswinforTallPineslast_img

Pregnant women and extremely obese people at high risk of flu complications

Source:https://www.idsociety.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 19 2018Pregnant women and the extremely obese are among those at high risk for complications from the flu – including death – and should be tested and begin antiviral treatment promptly if they are sick enough to be hospitalized with flu symptoms, according to updated guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Outpatients who have been diagnosed with the flu and are at high risk for complications should also be provided antiviral treatment as soon as possible, note the seasonal influenza guidelines, which are published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.The guidelines recommend using newer and highly accurate molecular tests that deliver results in 15-60 minutes instead of rapid-influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs), which produce quick results but can be falsely negative in at least 30 percent of outpatients with influenza. While antiviral treatment is recommended within two days after the start of flu symptoms in people who aren’t at high risk for complications, the guidelines note they should be prescribed to those at high risk even if they have been sick for more than two days.People who are extremely obese have a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more. Others in the high-risk category include: young children (especially those younger than 2 years old); women who have recently given birth; those with a weakened immune system due to disease or medication (such as people with HIV or AIDS, cancer, who have had an organ transplant or who are on chronic steroids); people younger than 19 years old who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy; those with chronic medical conditions including asthma, neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders (such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy and stroke), heart or lung disease, kidney, liver or metabolic disorders; and nursing home residents; American Indians and native Alaskans.”Influenza can be serious, especially for the sizable group of people at high risk,” said Timothy M. Uyeki, MD, MPH, MPP, co-chair of the guidelines committee and chief medical officer of the Influenza Division of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “Annual influenza vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza, but it is not 100 percent effective. Those at high risk need to be encouraged to seek medical care right away if they develop influenza symptoms during influenza season.”Related StoriesLow humidity could be flu virus’ best friend$3.1 million NIH funding awarded to develop universal flu vaccineAustralian doctors are overprescribing flu antivirals, study revealsTypical flu signs and symptoms include fever, cough, muscle aches, chills, runny nose and sore throat. Other symptoms can include headache and chest pain.The guidelines note antiviral treatment should be started immediately in people at high risk of flu complications who are being admitted to the hospital with suspected influenza, without waiting for the results of molecular influenza testing. Influenza testing is important because physicians are more likely to treat patients with antiviral medications if they have a definitive diagnosis, further reducing the likelihood of prescribing antibiotics inappropriately, especially in outpatients.If people at high risk become seriously ill with influenza, health care providers should turn to infectious diseases (ID) doctors to provide expertise, the guidelines note.”High-risk individuals who are hospitalized with flu complications are at an increased risk for serious bacterial infections and infectious diseases physicians’ expertise is critical to ensuring they receive the best care,” said Andrew T. Pavia, MD, FIDSA co-chair of the guidelines committee and chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. “ID doctors also can provide guidance when a patient who has the flu is not responding to antiviral treatment or is getting worse.”The previous guidelines were published just before the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, the fourth pandemic in the past 100 years. Other pandemics occurred in 1918 (killing an estimated 675,000 people in the United States), 1957 and 1968. A pandemic is a worldwide outbreak of a new influenza A virus that is very different than seasonal influenza A viruses circulating in people. Once it begins circulating, the pandemic virus becomes a seasonal flu virus in subsequent years. Last season the flu was responsible for an estimated 49 million illnesses in the United States, including 960,000 hospitalizations and 79,000 deaths.”We are always concerned about preparing for the next pandemic, but we also are focused on preventing and controlling seasonal influenza,” said Dr. Uyeki. “While pandemics aren’t predictable, we know that every year we’re going to have seasonal influenza and we need to improve how we prevent and control it through influenza vaccination, better diagnosis and early antiviral treatment of patients.” read more