Journalists arrested over alleged theft of documents on Northern Ireland killings

(Top row left to right) Patsy O'Hare, Barney Green, Adrian Rogan, (bottom row left to right) Eamon Byrne, Daniel McCreanor and Malcom Jenkinson, who were killed in the tiny Heights Bar in Loughinisland, Co Down “The inquiry centres on the theft of sensitive material, which was used in a documentary film re-examining the 1994 murders,” the statement said, adding that the theft “potentially puts lives at risk.” “The film exposed the failure of police to properly investigate Loughinisland Massacre and bring suspected killers to account,” Gibney said. “Police reaction? Re-open murder investigation? No. Arrest the truth tellers.”On June 18, 1994, Protestant paramilitary gunmen entered the Heights Bar in the village of Loughinisland and opened fire indiscriminately on customers watching Ireland play Italy in a televised World Cup match, Six were killed, including 87-year-old Barney Greene, one of the oldest victims in the ‘Troubles’.Among the failings identified in the 2016 Police Ombudsman report was that police informants at the most senior level within armed Loyalist groups were involved in the importation of arms used in at least 70 murders and attempted murders, including the Loughinisland killings.Over 3,600 people died during the 30-year armed conflict between Catholic Irish nationalists seeking a united Ireland and their Protestant rivals who want to keep Northern Ireland British. A Durham police spokesman later said the two had been released on bail pending further enquiries, which he said were likely to continue for a number of months.The producer of the documentary, Alex Gibney, said on Twitter that the pair had been arrested “for doing good, hard-hitting journalism.” Two journalists were arrested on Friday over the suspected theft of documents from Northern Ireland’s police ombudsman that were used in a documentary that alleged police collusion in the 1994 murder of six soccer fans.The two were later released on bail, police said, and the documentary makers secured a temporary court order to stop police examining documents and material seized in raids on Friday.The 2017 documentary “No Stone Unturned” named a Protestant paramilitary gunman it said police believed shot six fans in one of the most notorious episodes of Northern Ireland’s ‘Troubles’.It also detailed alleged police collusion, which a 2016 report by the Northern Ireland police ombudsman said was a significant feature in the killings. No one has been prosecuted for the killings.The arrests, made in a joint operation between police from Northern Ireland and the northern British region of Durham, relate to the suspected theft of materials held by the office of the Police Ombudsman of Northern Ireland, police said in a statement. The film exposed the failure of police to properly investigate Loughinisland Massacre and bring suspected killers to accountAlex Gibney, Producer (Top row left to right) Patsy O’Hare, Barney Green, Adrian Rogan, (bottom row left to right) Eamon Byrne, Daniel McCreanor and Malcom Jenkinson, who were killed in the tiny Heights Bar in Loughinisland, Co DownCredit:PA Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Bosworth Field must be saved for the nation to protect all ancient

“We should plant our standard squarely on preserving Bosworth and its heritage, both past and yet to be discovered.” “Bosworth is the battlefield under threat today; but while the current legal framework continues, no doubt there will be others,” Mr Skidmore will tell MPs at a debate in Westminster Hall today.”For to build over one part of a battlefield site, threatens to set a precedent of permissiveness that could erode our ability to protect our battlefields across the country. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Ancient battlefields will be at risk if building is allowed to go ahead at Bosworth Field, ministers will be warned today, as campaigners launched a bid to buy the threatened land for the nation. Chris Skidmore, a Conservative party vice chairman and leading expert on Richard III, will call for better protections for the 46 battlefields in England after automotive specialists Horiba Mira Ltd applied to build a test track for driverless vehicles on part of the site.  The Battle of Bosworth in August 1485 was a crucial moment in British history which saw the death of Richard III, ending the Plantagenet reign and bringing the Tudor dynasty to the throne. More than 12,000 people have signed a petition urging Hinkley and Bosworth Borough Council to refuse permission for the new 83 acre test track, while The Battlefields Trust has launched a campaign to buy the land from Horiba Mira.  Richard III's body was discovered in Leicester Mr Skidmore will also call for the Government to tighten planning rules which currently only stop building on battlefields if there is “substantial harm”.He will add: “I know that this is a local decision that will be made by the Council, and I am sure that they will reflect upon the written submissions and petition next month. “But we must recognise here the precedent nationally that this application risks setting. “And we must also ask, how have we managed to get to this situation in the first place that a battlefield of national historic importance should be placed under threat?” The decision on whether to allow the test track to go ahead will be made by Hinckley and Borough Council on September 25. Bosworth FieldCredit:Royal Collection/Richard III’s body was discovered in Leicester The land in which the battle of Bosworth is set needs to be bought for the nation.Kelvin van Hasselt, vice president of The Battlefields Trust Kelvin van Hasselt, vice president of The Battlefields Trust, said: “The land in which the battle of Bosworth is set needs to be bought for the nation just as the Americans do with their battlefields “The wider battlefield faces a severe threat of building which will prevent its proper presentation in the future.“In particular it will not be possible to stand where Henry Tudor stood when he first saw Richard III’s army, ponder the decisions he then made and from there to walk in his footsteps to the point where the armies engaged. read more